Jump to content
Waterlover212

Lack of cold water in apartment

Recommended Posts

I live in New York City in a pre-war co-op apartment building and I've been having problems with the cold water in my kitchen and bathroom. It takes 5-10 minutes for the water to become cold. It often starts out warm or lukewarm (75-80 degrees fahrenheit). Others in my apartment line also have this problem. I told my super about it and he thinks the problem is in my apartment line somewhere but that trying to identify and locate the problem will cost thousands of dollars and will involve opening apartment walls and taking out pipes etc. One board member doesn't think it's an issue as he said something about cold water reaching ambient temperature when it sits in pipes for a while. I don't think this is true because I used to live in a different unit in the same building where the water temperature was 58 degrees fahrenheit and I feel that I should be able to expect the water to be cold when it first comes out.
There are a lot of people who don't think it's a serious issue but it's a real nuisance to me because I drink a lot of water and I like to brush my teeth with cold water. Is the building required to fix something like this regardless of the cost, difficulty, or inconvenience? And how does one determine what 'cold' water is? I talked to one lawyer about this and he said that cold water is defined as water that's drinkable and what I described to him does not sound like drinkable water. Others say that cold water just means water that isn't hot. What are your thoughts? Do I have grounds for reporting my building management to the city? 
Please write back to me as this issue has really been stressful and upsetting to me. I've tried to get my building to do something about this but have had no luck. 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, PayrollHRGuy said:

I've never seen laws requiring "cold water", plenty requiring hot water.

 

Have you checked with other places in the neighborhood to see what their water temp is?

My relatives who live nearby have cold water temps of 65-61 when first turned on. My former studio was 57-58. According to 311's ABC's of Housing Guide, residents are supposed to have heat, hot, and cold water. 

https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/hpd/downloads/pdf/renter-resources/abcs-of-housing.pdf 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, Waterlover212 said:

I drink a lot of water

 

Tap water?

 

 

59 minutes ago, Waterlover212 said:

I like to brush my teeth with cold water.

 

75-80 degree water is perfectly fine for brushing teeth, and whatever water actually goes into your mouth (which is probably no more than an ounce) will warm up to the temperature inside your mouth (~98.6 degrees) within a few seconds.

 

 

1 hour ago, Waterlover212 said:

Is the building required to fix something like this regardless of the cost, difficulty, or inconvenience?

 

A building has no ability to fix anything.  The question is whether your landlord has a legal obligation to ensure you have "cold water," and I doubt any such obligation exists.

 

 

1 hour ago, Waterlover212 said:

And how does one determine what 'cold' water is?


"Cold" and "warm" and "hot" are subjective terms.

 

 

1 hour ago, Waterlover212 said:

I talked to one lawyer about this and he said that cold water is defined as water that's drinkable and what I described to him does not sound like drinkable water.

 

Defined by whom or what?  Also, there's absolutely nothing about 75-80 degree water that makes it not "drinkable."

 

 

1 hour ago, Waterlover212 said:

Do I have grounds for reporting my building management to the city?


I can't claim familiarity with the myriad of oddball landlord-tenant laws in NYC, but I seriously doubt it.  You've only give two examples of how this is an issue for you, and neither really stands up to scrutiny.

 

Also, I looked at the links you provided and nothing suggested there's any definition of "cold water" or any actionable right to same.

 

Ultimately, if you don't like it, you're free to move as soon as your lease expires or, if you're a month-to-month tenant, upon giving 30 days' notice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Waterlover212 said:

No, but they mention that tenants are required to have cold water. Read through it carefully.

 

It's 105 degrees in Phoenix as I write this. I turned on the kitchen cold water tap and the temperature of the water stream was 100 degrees. I took a couple of minutes to cool down to 80 degrees and that's where it stayed. At 80 degrees it was cool to the touch but tepid (lukewarm) when I drank it.

 

Like you, I prefer drinking cold water so I keep a couple of gallons in the fridge and drink from them.

 

I have no preference when I brush my teeth so tap water is fine.

 

My advice: Keep water in the fridge. Drink from it and brush your teeth with it because you sure as heck don't have a "legal" issue here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...