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2 minutes ago, adjusterjack said:

Figuring an hour each, comes to about 271 days.

 

:P

I don't get the joke 

 

edit: ok, I get it now. 

 

I meant the motion that is called "6500". I get the joke, and humor is cathartic so thank you for that, but anyone know the answer sought?

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I responded facetiously because you didn't mention your state, nor any details. Things can be read different ways by different people and the best way to get helpful comments is to provide details about what is happening to you and where it's happening.

 

I can only guess that you are referring to MCR 6.500 Motion for Post Conviction Relief:

 

https://michigancriminaldefenseattorneys.org/motion-relief-from-judgment-michigan/

 

I haven't found anything online that provides a time table. I suppose it depends on the court's backlog and whether everything was filed properly. I don't think any Michigan criminal attorneys participate here.

 

Based on the following checklist I'm guessing that it's not something that happens quickly:

 

https://mjieducation.mi.gov/documents/criminal-qrms/325-mrj-checklist

 

Your attorney might have a better idea of how long it takes.

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On 5/4/2019 at 10:07 AM, Guest101A1 said:

Does anyone know how long 6500 motions tend to take (time wise) from start to finish on average?

 

Depends on what sorts of motions they are (motion to continue trial date, motion to dismiss, motion for summary judgment).  I've spent anywhere from two to over 100 hours on a motion.  If we assume an average motion takes 7.5 hours, then 6,500 motions would take 48,750 hours, which works out to 975 work weeks of 50 hours, which would be just under 20 years of work (assume 2-3 weeks off per year).

 

Now...if you want to offer a better explanation of what you're talking about, we may have more input for you.

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At an average fee of $300 per hour, PG1067, after 20 years you would have made $14,625,000 ($731,250 per year).

 

Assuming you could live on $300,000+ per year, If you saved the rest with a modest return of 3% you'd have about $10,000,000 at the end of 20 years.

 

You could retire to an island and sip pina coladas while native girls wait on you hand and foot.

 

But I suspect we aren't talking about the quantity of motions here. :)

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18 minutes ago, adjusterjack said:

At an average fee of $300 per hour, PG1067, after 20 years you would have made $14,625,000 ($731,250 per year).

 

Assuming you could live on $300,000+ per year, If you saved the rest with a modest return of 3% you'd have about $10,000,000 at the end of 20 years.

 

You could retire to an island and sip pina coladas while native girls wait on you hand and foot.

 

You are making a few mistakes in your assumptions and computations. Lawyers have a lot of business expenses; they don't keep all of that hourly fee. And then after that, there is the bite for federal, state, and local taxes.

 

But let's assume the lawyer keeps all $300/hour and saves all of it but $300,000/year. If the lawyer bills for 2000 hours for the year (50 weeks x 40 hours a week) that's $600,000/year, not $731,250. Bear in mind that 2000 billable hours is a lot, lawyers have to work a lot more than 40 hours a week to get that. So after the living expenses of $300,000 a year, the lawyer has $300,000 a year to invest. At 3% per year compounded annually, that would work out to be $8,061,112 after 20 years. But given the incorrect assumptions above, the actual number would be a lot lower because there won't be $300,000/year to invest.

 

44 minutes ago, adjusterjack said:

But I suspect we aren't talking about the quantity of motions here. :)

 

No, but the OP didn't make clear exactly what it was that he was talking about. 😉

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54 minutes ago, PayrollHRGuy said:

 

If all a lawyer does is these motions the expense cost is going to be significantly lower than the average lawyer.

 

Not so. The lawyer's office rent, salaries, equipment, research services, etc., are all things that still must be paid. What savings do you think would come about if the work is filing and arguing these motions rather that filing and arguing other motions/pleadings? 

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2 hours ago, adjusterjack said:

 

Which is why we are kidding around while we wait for him to come back and tell us. :D

I clarified in my reply to the first responder near the top of this thread, maybe you missed it but I am referring to motions called 6500. Anyone have any experience or knowledge on the average wait time for a decision on one?

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6 minutes ago, Guest101A1 said:

I am referring to motions called 6500.

 

"[M]otions called 6500" tells us virtually nothing.  You provided absolutely no context whatsoever -- other than the fact that you posted on a board relating to "Criminal Law - After Sentencing."  You didn't even identify a state.  in his second response in this thread, "adjusterjack" offered a guess.  Was his guess correct?  If not, then you're going to have to provide a better explanation of what you're talking about.

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On 5/4/2019 at 2:36 PM, adjusterjack said:

I responded facetiously because you didn't mention your state, nor any details. Things can be read different ways by different people and the best way to get helpful comments is to provide details about what is happening to you and where it's happening.

 

I can only guess that you are referring to MCR 6.500 Motion for Post Conviction Relief:

 

https://michigancriminaldefenseattorneys.org/motion-relief-from-judgment-michigan/

 

I haven't found anything online that provides a time table. I suppose it depends on the court's backlog and whether everything was filed properly. I don't think any Michigan criminal attorneys participate here.

 

Based on the following checklist I'm guessing that it's not something that happens quickly:

 

https://mjieducation.mi.gov/documents/criminal-qrms/325-mrj-checklist

 

Your attorney might have a better idea of how long it takes.

Yeah, I can couldn't find a time table either. 

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Thanks for trying guys. I was hoping for real life experience or at least second hand stories . Google searches seem to lack all but basic cookie cutter stuff with no time lines. Oh well. 

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3 hours ago, Guest101A1 said:

I was hoping for real life experience or at least second hand stories .

 

You're not getting it.

 

We are trying to get you to say something like:

 

"I am in (state). I was convicted of (crime) on (date). I (or my lawyer) filed a motion for (what) on (date). How long does it take for a judge to rule on the motion."

 

Without some background, I'm afraid all we are going to do is amuse ourselves.

 

 

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16 hours ago, Guest101A1 said:

I was hoping for real life experience

 

That's not what these boards are for.

 

 

16 hours ago, Guest101A1 said:

or at least second hand stories .

 

That we might be able to provide, but you need to describe what you're talking about in some coherent manner.  You were told multiple times that your reference to "6500 motions" was unclear.  I flat-out asked you if "adjusterjack's" guess was correct, but you ignored that question.  See also "adjusterjack's" comments immediately above.

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