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ms anonymous

Supposed warrant but not yet arrested; police have had opportunity to arrest

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A few weeks ago, a police detective came to my house wanting to speak to my husband about an incident that had occurred about a week prior. The detective asked my husband to come to the police station with him, and my husband willingly went with the detective. My husband returned home about a half hour later, saying that the detective was questioning him about a car theft. My husband had gone to a local bar and a car was stolen from the parking lot while he was there. The detective showed my husband a picture of himself leaving the bar, but that was it. The detective said the car was recovered and he kept assuring my husband that nothing major would come from the incident. A few days later, some paperwork was dropped at our door. My husband wouldn't let me look at the papers, but apparently it was a warrant for his arrest in regards to the car theft. About a week ago, while I was home alone, I got a knock on my door. I answered and it was 4 officers, including the detective who had questioned my husband previously, looking for my husband. He was not home and I told them he was not, and even invited them to look in my house to show that my husband was indeed not at home. They said for me to have my husband call the police station when he got home. I said I would and they left. My husband returned home from the grocery store about an hour after the police left and I told him what had happened. He said he would call them the following day. Not more than an hour after that, the same detective and another detective showed up at our door. My husband answered the door and the second detective asked where he was earlier in the afternoon. My husband showed them a receipt from a Lyft ride he had taken that afternoon, and the second detective said that was fine, that my husband was not the person they were looking for and they just wanted to verify his whereabouts. It turns out the officers who had shown up to my door earlier had been looking for a suspect in a bank robbery that had occurred that afternoon close to our house. The robbery suspect fit my husband's general description, but the second detective seemed satisfied that my husband was not the man they were looking for. The two detectives left our house and nothing else came of it. They had opportunity to arrest my husband on his warrant for the supposed car theft, but they did nothing. About three days after the two detectives had questioned my husband about his whereabouts during the robbery, a third detective came to our house, asking  to speak with my husband. This detective told my husband he was investigating a break-in to a cell phone store near our house where my husband used to work (he was let go from that job back in November).  I was about to leave for work and my husband's son was at home (due to no school that day), so the detective told my husband to call him in the morning to arrange a better time for my husband to go to the police station to answer questions about the store break-in. Once again, the detective (who did have another officer with him) did not arrest my husband, even though he has a supposed warrant. My husband spoke to the detective on the phone the next day, asking if it would be alright if he came in on Monday to answer his questions about the phone store break-in. The detective was very cordial and said that would be fine. My concern is that once the police have my husband at the police station, will they arrest him for the supposed car theft? I just don't understand why they haven't arrested him yet, even though he apparently has a warrant and the police have had ample opportunities to arrest him. Is there an actual warrant or is the first detective just telling us that to scare us? This whole situation is so confusing. My husband is not guilty of anything and we are very confused and irritated that the police keep coming to our house and bothering us for every crime that occurs near us. Any advice?

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1 hour ago, ms anonymous said:

A few weeks ago, a police detective came to my house wanting to speak to my husband about an incident that had occurred about a week prior. The detective asked my husband to come to the police station with him, and my husband willingly went with the detective.

 

That was your husband's first, biggest, and dumbest mistake he could ever make.

 

Sit down with your husband and watch these videos and you'll know why. He can be innocent and still end up in prison.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GjCJ6Xqjg0

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FENubmZGj8

 

What your husband needs to do now is say "No comment. I'm invoking my right to an attorney." And he needs to keep saying it over and over again even if he does get arrested, especially if he gets arrested.

 

And now is the time to get him to a lawyer while he still has some control over it.

 

 

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Should he wait for the detective to come to our house and then tell him he's not going to answer any questions? Should he call the detective and let him know he won't answer any more questions without an attorney? I'm tired of the police showing up at our door all the time

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Neither. He need to hire an attorney now, and let the attorney talk to the police. Your husband has no clue how to talk to police without incriminating himself.

 

ANYTHING he says to the police can be used against him.

 

What he says to his attorney cannot be used against him.

 

You both need to watch those videos. Your husband is on very dangerous ground.

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PLEASE, please, read (Regent Law School prof) James Duane's short book, "You Have The Right To Remain Innocent" for the chilling details about matters like this. He is the same prof who made the video referenced above BUT his book is more up-to-date and reflects recent SC decisions which changed the rules about "pleading the 5th". Check the book!

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1 hour ago, Bill Miller said:

PLEASE, please, read (Regent Law School prof) James Duane's short book, "You Have The Right To Remain Innocent"

 

Available on Amazon as an instant kindle download for $1.99.

 

https://www.amazon.com/You-Have-Right-Remain-Innocent-ebook/dp/B01DAD218W/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3C0HU22LNNHVU&keywords=you+have+the+right+to+remain+innocent&qid=1556124230&s=digital-text&sprefix=you+have+the+right%2Caps%2C196&sr=1-1-catcorr

 

 

 

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