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pfurman159@yahoo.com

Theft of Wages

8 posts in this topic

I work for a company that is based on a percent of performance for the week. Such as, each product is worth a certain amount of time, and should be completed within that time or better to obtain 100 percent or better for a base pay. The problem is first of all, we may obtain over 100 percent by our break, but during the break with no production being produced, the time for break is included in that hour of production, resulting in lowering the production for that period of time. I didn't know they could take away what we had already earned. Another, is our supervisors have the right to add or take away time that we were clocked out of our production job, doing something else, thus also lowering or escalating the production rate. This also does not seem fair, as some people are showed favoritism. So it seems that for the first two hours of work, we need to work to earn our break in order to have 15 minutes over our production time in order to stay at 100 percent or higher. And then again for our second break of the afternoon.

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42 minutes ago, pfurman159@yahoo.com said:

I work for a company that is based on a percent of performance for the week.

 

What you wrote here is that the company "is based on a percent of performance for the week."  Is that really what you intended to write?

 

Are you an employee or an independent contractor?

 

 

43 minutes ago, pfurman159@yahoo.com said:

but during the break with no production being produced

 

I really hate it when no production is produced.

 

You didn't ask a question, so I'm uncertain what the purpose of your post is.

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Ok. The way we are paid is percent based. We get bundles of a product. The bundle has to be processed in a time set for one piece of the bundle to be complete. For instance, 10 seconds per piece, or 10 seconds time 10 in a bundle, would be 100. This is just an example. The question is about whether it is wage theft or not if before I take my break I have 100 percent and when I get back from break my percent has gone down by 15 minutes. I didn't think an employer could take away something you had already earned. No, I make much more than minimum wage. The higher our percent, the higher the pay.

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The method you are paid is a version of piece work, what sounds like an overly complex version of piece work but piece work nonetheless.  Under this you are paid for what you produce not how long you work. As long as you are making an amount equal to or over the minimum wage for the time you do work it is legal.

 

 

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Yes, that is it, but not exactly. They were going to change it to being paid by the piece, but have stuck to the old way. So they can subtract from our percent earned up until break, by taking a break? Then we are told we can't work through break. Well which is it? I will be fined for working my break, but I also can't work my break? We play this game of beat the clock all the time by this method. This is my first job at being paid this way. Don't care for it because you never know what your pay will be based on all the crap that takes you away from your production by other people and other problems. This also costs us money. Some of us have multiple jobs and have to go from one station to another and don't get compensated for that time and it is not our fault that we have to move around. At Amazon this time is taken into consideration and your scanner calculates that time so it does not interfere in your production time. Is it illegal for my company to not pay for our so called "travel time" from one station to the other?

 

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If, at the end of the week, you are paid at least minimum wage times the number of hours you worked (plus overtime if applicable) the law will assume you have been paid correctly. The law doesn't care what you might have earned if your employer's internal formula had been applied differently - only what you actually are paid.

 

However, the law does care about travel time, up to a point. You do not have to be paid for time from home to your first stop of the day, or time from the last stop of the day home. You do have to be paid for travel time between stations during the work day.

 

In your state, the only break that is required is a 30 minute unpaid lunch break if you work 6 hours or more in the day.

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