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Pam

Patient dies from choking during upper GI

7 posts in this topic

Patient was in hospital, due to water retention from congestive heart failure.  After being there a week, he spit up very small amount of blood, so an upper GI was performed.  During that procedure, he choked to death.  People dont die during this procedure, do they?  When the hospital called his wife, they were still doing chest compressions, but obviously to no avail.

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24 minutes ago, Pam said:

People dont die during this procedure, do they? 

 

Not often.

 

But other issues could have exacerbated the situation.

 

Like congestive heart failure, age, other medical conditions. Details count.

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As in any medical malpractice case, an expert would have to review the records and the patients's history to come to any conclusion about whether the patient did or did not not receive the minimum standard of care.  To speculate based on the extremely limited information you posted would be inappropriate.

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2 hours ago, Pam said:

People dont die during this procedure, do they?

 

Seems like a question better asked of a doctor than a bunch of anonymous strangers on a legal message board.  That said, I assume the answer is that some people do but most don't.

 

Is that really the only question you intended to ask?

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Apologies.  Wasnt intentionally trying to waste anyone's time.  This would obviously be better asked of a doctor.  In my experience-however limited-people in certain professions, ie, police, fire, medical, legal, will not disagree with another member of the same field, regardless of the circumstances.  I, clearly, am not in the medical or legal field, or I would have known the need for certain details.  I guess I dont know what I should have asked.  We are all still a little shocked.  This just doesnt strike me as a high risk procedure.  Thank you for your replies, I do appreciate your time.

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That is why a doctor isn't who YOU ('YOU' being the person with standing to take legal action and it may not be Pam) should ask. YOU should talk to a lawyer that specializes in medical malpractice law.  They will have a stable of doctors willing to testify if another doctor screwed up.

 

All medical procedures have risk.  An upper GI on a person that is already vomiting blood has additional risks. Though those risks aren't as high as doing nothing.

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2 hours ago, Pam said:

Apologies.  Wasnt intentionally trying to waste anyone's time.  This would obviously be better asked of a doctor.  In my experience-however limited-people in certain professions, ie, police, fire, medical, legal, will not disagree with another member of the same field, regardless of the circumstances.  I, clearly, am not in the medical or legal field, or I would have known the need for certain details.  I guess I dont know what I should have asked.  We are all still a little shocked.  This just doesnt strike me as a high risk procedure.  Thank you for your replies, I do appreciate your time.

 

You haven't indicated your connection to the situation you described, but if the deceased's surviving spouse thinks medical malpractice may have occurred, she should consult with a local medical malpractice attorney.

 

P.S.  Just because a patient dies during a non-high risk procedure doesn't mean malpractice occurred or should be suspected.

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