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johndoe_5359

Credible Diploma

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Federal and Tennessee law allow a school to disclose to others that it granted a diploma to a student but no federal or Tennessee law requires a school to do so. You might get more helpful responses if you explain the circumstances that lead to you asking the question and why it matters to you whether the school confirms the diploma or not. Why, for example, did you place this question on the child custody and support board? Your question does not seem to have any connection to custody or support on the face of it.

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12 hours ago, johndoe_5359 said:

Does any school have to tell anyone who asks for any reason whatsoever, especially to deter fraud, that it gave a person a diploma in Tennessee?

 

First of all, as phrased, this has nothing to do with family law, child custody or support.

 

Second, while I don't really understand the "especially to deter fraud" part of this, the answer is no, and I have a hard time conceiving why you think the answer might be otherwise.  Indeed, I would expect most schools to refrain from responding to such inquiries in order to protect the privacy interests of students (especially as concerns minors).

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Hi @johndoe_5359

 

As others have mentioned, most likely no law this broad exists, but under certain circumstances people could request verification of a degree given by an educational institution. For example, if a person applied for a job and claimed to have been graduated from a certain school, the employer could request verification from the school. However, if the average person makes this same request for no discernible reason, the institution will likely deny this request for privacy reasons.

 

The FindLaw.com Team

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If a spouse during a child custody proceeding says they are capable of paying child support, because they have a high school diploma or college degree, can the legal representative, paralegal or attorney, of the other spouse ask for legal verification from the school? how?

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Anyone can ask the school to confirm or deny that it has issued a diploma or degree to the individual.  The school may comply with the request but is not legally obligated to do so.  If confirmation is withheld but the court deems it to be relevant to the case, the judge can issue a subpoena or court order directing the school to provide the information, at which time the school is legally required to comply.

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14 hours ago, johndoe_5359 said:

 

If a spouse during a child custody proceeding says they are capable of paying child support, because they have a high school diploma or college degree, can the legal representative, paralegal or attorney, of the other spouse ask for legal verification from the school?

 

 

I assume "they" is a reference to the spouse to made the statement about having the earning capacity (in which case, it should be a singular pronoun such as "he" or "she").  That said, anyone can ask anything of anyone.

 

 

14 hours ago, johndoe_5359 said:

how?

 

By phone.  By mail.  By visiting the registrar's office at the school.  Do you really not know this?

 

If one party's educational status is relevant in a legal proceeding, the other party can take discovery, including serving a subpoena or simply requesting a copy of a transcript.

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