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ngarcia108

lawsuit for false advertising

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on Sunday august 5, 2015 a country club sponsored a golf tournament in which a automobile dealership would donate an automobile as a prize to any golfer who shot a hole in one. The automobile was parked near the clubhouse with an advertisement  poster stating the free automobile for any golfer who shot a hole in one. I paid the requisite entrance fee for me and my son to participate in the tournament. My son who is 16 (minor) shot a hole in one in presence of other members. We notified the dealership but they refuse to tender the automobile. Can anyone give me any references to any similar case regarding advertising contracts that are false? can my me and/or my son sue the auto dealership or the country club that sponsored the event? any references or responses would be appreciated.

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Hi @ngarcia108

 

Welcome to the community and thanks for posting. Sorry to hear about your situation. Was that a typo in the date in your post, or did this event actually occur over a year ago?

 

You may want to speak with a local attorney about your remedies. To find an attorney near you, you can use our Lawyer Directory.

 

Best of luck!

The FindLaw.com Team

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Businesses offering prizes for a hole-in-one will almost always purchase insurance to protect against the extremely unlikely event that a golfer will actually make a hole in one.   The insurance will impose conditions such as the minimum distance from the tee to the hole and a requirement that there be an independent monitor verifying the hole-in-one. Normally, the group sponsoring the tournament would be responsible for verifying that your son actually scored the hole in one.  Of coursour e the fact that your son is a minor raises another complication.  As a minor he may not be allowed to own the car  which means the car would have to be titled to an adult as a custodian of the minor's interest.

 

So, the first questions are: did your son hit from the proper tee that was at the proper distance, and was his hole in one verified by an independent and disinterested monitor?

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1 hour ago, ngarcia108 said:

Can anyone give me any references to any similar case regarding advertising contracts that are false?

 

I'm not sure what you're asking for, but no one is going to research case authority for you.  Also, what you've described is not false advertising (and I'm not sure what "advertising contracts that are false" might refer to).

 

 

1 hour ago, ngarcia108 said:

can my me and/or my son sue the auto dealership or the country club that sponsored the event?

 

Anyone can sue anyone for anything.

 

 

1 hour ago, ngarcia108 said:

the auto dealership did not believe us

 

Didn't believe you about what?  If this was a sponsored tournament, logic would seem to dictate that persons would be watching to verify any holes in one.  Alternatively, the typical custom is that others in the playing group would verify the hole in one.  In any event, the rules of the contest should specify what sort of verification is needed.

 

 

1 hour ago, ngarcia108 said:

I think it had something to do with my son being a minor and them wanting to get out of giving him the prize because of his age.

 

I don't know if this belief is based on any actual facts, but the contest rules may well have provided that only adults are eligible.

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