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persay

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More facts, including what state or federal court the case was being tried in, what kind of case it is, as well as your relationship to the person involved, would be necessary to provide a specific answer to that. However, in almost all cases, the only person who can represent another in court is an attorney admitted to practice in that court. The POA that you have cannot override those rules. There are a few courts that will permit a non-lawyer to represent someone in some circumstances, however.

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Depends on what you mean. You cannot represent that person in court; that would be the unauthorized practice of law (a power of attorney cannot authorize a non-attorney to act as one -- illustrating the difference between an "attorney at law" and an "attorney in fact"). You can, however, hire a lawyer to represent that person and make all decisions that the client would otherwise make (within the scope of the power granted by the POA, of course).

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