Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I am in process of name change for my minor child. Under Family Code Chapter 45 Section 45.002 it as if child is subject to continuing exclusive jurisdiction of court under Chapter 155. The court did terminate the parent-child relationship between his father and him.  Does this make him the subject to continuing exclusive jurisdiction? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After checking both sections my guess is yes, the child would be subject to continuing exclusive jurisdiction of the same court that terminated the parent-child relationship.

 

Besides, it seems to make sense that you would go back to the same court and petition for the name change under the same case number.

 

Doesn't it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi bluteam,

 

Welcome to the community, and thank you for your question. Questions regarding jurisdiction can be complex, and may depend on the specific circumstances of your case, and the language of your prior custody order or dissolution judgment.

 

To be certain that the court has retained continuing jurisdiction, you may want to consult with an experienced family law attorney. If you need help finding a family law lawyer in your area, you can use our Lawyer Directory. Many of the attorneys in our directory offer free consultations.

 

Best of luck with you case and let us know if you have further questions.

The FindLaw.com Team

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am adopting a little girl I have had since she was 1. I want to add my last name yo hers.  I don't want her to have to use my last name. Do I hyphenate it or just add it. She just started writing her name and I just want it listed so if she wants to use it she can. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some states place restrictions on what you can name your adoptive child, and others do not, and you don't identify your state.  With that caveat, I'll say that you can probably change her name to whatever you wish, and that will become her "legal" name and her birth certificate will probably be modified to reflect her new name.  As a matter of convenience, most adoptive parents choose for their child to have their own last name, but that's really up to you.  If you want to hyphenate her "old" name with yours, that's fine, or you can even leave it the way it is now.

 

But just so you know, your daughter can use whatever name she wants informally, regardless of what's on her birth certificate, with your approval.  So for example, if her name is Jenny Jones and yours is Smith, you can name her Jenny Smith or Jenny Smith-Jones, or Jenny Jones Smith.  She can then call herself Jenny Smith or Jenny Jones to her friends and classmates, who I dare say won't be checking her birth certificate.  She will of course have to use her legal name for important matters such as hospital admission, school registration, or her drivers license application.

 

A local family law attorney can give you more specific advice with respect to your unidentified state's laws and judicial guidelines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Msladydee137 said:

Do I hyphenate it or just add it.

 

First of all, this seems to have nothing to do with the topic of this eleven month old thread that you resurrected for no apparent reason.  Second, I'm not sure I see any legal issue in your post.  The law does not care if you want to call your child "Jane Smith Jones" or "Jane Smith-Jones."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...