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Mr.innocent385

switching public defender

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You can contact their supervisor but there's no guarantee.  Public defenders are assigned by their office and there's never enough attorneys to go around for all the cases that land in their office.  If you want to pick your own attorney, you'll have to hire private counsel. 

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This is from an Illinois case, but generally in each state it's the same argument:

 

Substitute Counsel

 

Defendant also argues that the trial court erred in failing to provide him with a different attorney than the APD originally assigned to the case. He claims that the trial court should have provided him with a private attorney, as opposed to a different attorney from the public defender's office.

 

While criminal defendants have a right to counsel of their choosing, "the right to counsel of choice does not extend to defendants who require counsel to be appointed for them." U.S. v. Gonzalez-Lopez, 548 U.S. 140, 151 (2006); see also People v. Baez, 241 Ill. 2d 44, 106 n.5 (2011). "A criminal defendant has no right to choose his appointed counsel or insist on representation by a particular public defender." People v. Wanke, 303 Ill. App. 3d 772, 782 (1999).

 

Instead, a defendant may be entitled to the replacement of appointed counsel only if he shows "good cause" for substituting his appointed attorney. Id.; People v. Royark, 215 Ill. App. 3d 255, 266 (1991). A defendant's dissatisfaction with counsel, arguments or disagreements about tactical matters, or assertions of a deteriorated relationship are insufficient cause to substitute counsel other than the public defender. Wanke, 303 Ill. App. 3d at 782; see also Royark, 215 Ill. App. 3d at 266 ("[T]he fact that an appointed attorney and his client bicker between themselves does not require a court to grant a motion for new counsel."). A trial court's decision on a motion for substitution of counsel is reviewed for an abuse of discretion. People v. Brisco, 2012 IL App (1st) 101612, ¶ 41; Wanke, 303 Ill. App. 3d at 782.

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Just in time to answer your questions, FindLaw comes thru:

 

Can I Switch My Criminal Defense Attorney Mid-Case?
By Ephrat Livni, Esq. on March 16, 2016 2:59 PM

So you hired a criminal defense attorney who seemed to suit your style but now you have been working with this person for a bit, and you are not thrilled. You can change lawyers at most stages of your defense, although not all, and not without the court's approval.

But there is a process for this -- you must file a motion with the court to substitute counsel -- and the details will vary from state to state. Before you make the switch, let's consider when and why you might want to change lawyers and the process for doing so.

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