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Inocent95

I'm 20 and on probation, can the judge ask for a letter from my parents?

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I was put on probation after dealing with court for months. I was found guilty for possession of Marijuana. As a requirement of my probation the judge has asked me to get a letter from my parents saying that they know what has happened and know that I am on probation. All my friends and coworkers think this is illegal considering that I am 20 years old. I have dealt with this whole court thing without letting my parents find out and I would like to keep it that way. I could really use some legal advise to find out if the judge can really ask that of me, since I live on my own in a different state and pay for myself. 

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Obviously the judge CAN ask you for the letter because he DID ask you for a letter.

 

All your "friends and co-workers" are not lawyers and don't have a clue.

 

Bottom line: You've already been convicted. You're on probation instead of jail. You obey the probation requirements or go to jail. Your choice.

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All my friends and coworkers think this is illegal considering that I am 20 years old.

 

I would be willing to bet that precisely zero of your friends and coworkers have been to law school or could cite any statute or case authority to support their opinions.  Correct?

 

 

 

I could really use some legal advise to find out if the judge can really ask that of me, since I live on my own in a different state and pay for myself. 

 

The judge can ask anything he likes.  Has he really only asked you to do this?  Or did he order you to do it?  He may be under the impression that you still live with your parents, and he wants to be sure they know that they'll be having a convicted criminal on probation living with them.  Is he aware that you don't live with them?  Has he told you what will happen if you can't or don't obtain the letter?

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I'd feel free to appeal on topic of judge imposing this as *a condition of granting probation* if in fact he did so vs. ask. I suspect aan appellate court might agree it's improper (not necessarily "illegal", howev). You'll want to accept unintended consequences that might make things more difficult though.

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