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pinky1969

Manatory OT

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What does the law state about making staff stay over to work extra shifts and not being able to leave without getting written up.****** policy does state that they can hold staff over incase of extreme emergency situations but is being short handed considered to be a emergency when the units can be locked down till staffing is back up all over the state?  

Edited by FindLaw_AHK
This post has been edited to remove personal or identifying information. -Moderator

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pinky1969, on 25 Jun 2013 - 12:24 PM, said:

What does the law state about making staff stay over to work extra shifts and not being able to leave without getting written up.

Since you didn't identify your state, it's impossible to know exactly what the law says, but I don't know of any state in which an employer is prohibited from taking adverse employment action against an employee who refuses to work "extra shifts" or overtime.

pinky1969, on 25 Jun 2013 - 12:24 PM, said:

**** policy does state that they can hold staff over incase of extreme emergency situations but is being short handed considered to be a emergency when the units can be locked down till staffing is back up all over the state?

"Units"? "Locked down"? "****"? No idea what you mean by these things, but you should be aware that employers may modify their policies as they see fit.

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What does the law state about making staff stay over to work extra shifts and not being able to leave without getting written up.

 

In general, a private employer may require employees to work whatever hours the employer wishes. Federal and state laws do limit the number of hours that persons in certain selected occupations may work, principally those in the transportation industry (e.g. pilots, truckers, train engineers, etc). If you are employed by a government agency, the civil service rules that apply to you agency may provide more limits on what schedule the employer may require. Note, too, that if you are a member of a union, the union contract with the employer might limit what the employer may do. Without details of your employment, it is impossible to give you a specific answer as to what limits might apply.

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