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pg1067

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Everything posted by pg1067

  1. What is the nature of the relationship between the 16 year old and your husband (as I understand your follow up post, the other two are his nieces/nephews)? What "papers" did you sign? Misled by whom? Length of time between what and what? How were you misled? Regardless of how you answer these questions, there's not much anyone here will be able to tell you other than that you should seek counsel from a local attorney.
  2. What was the reason why this was processed as a credit and not a charge? Was it an error by you or one of your employees? An error by the processor? How long ago did this occur?
  3. There used to be a lawyer knowledgeable in Texas family law who posted here regularly, but I'd say it's been at least a couple years since he posted here regularly. To the best of my knowledge, no Texas attorneys currently follow these boards regularly.
  4. Until the court changes it, the current custody and support orders stand. If one of you seeks a modification based on the child now living with the father, it is likely that the court will order you to pay child support. How that would likely be handled given the existence of substantial arrears owed to you is something about which you'd need to consult with a local family law attorney. Note that your voluntary payment of your adult child's college bills are not relevant to this.
  5. Why not simply reverse the credit and run it as a charge? Talk with your credit card processing vendor about this.
  6. This is probably a moot point. The law isn't likely to impose any restrictions on your transfer of your interest in the property. The CC&Rs/by-laws might. Nevertheless, the answer to your question is that it depends on the specifics of the provision of the association rules and the specific law in question. Depends on the particulars of the rules and any applicable state law. Agree. No one here can solve your problem. As I told you last week, you need to have a lawyer review the CC&Rs and by-laws.
  7. Of course it is. This makes zero sense at all. Whether something is or isn't a crime is determined by the applicable state law, not by any single person, and certainly not by a school principal. Correct. It's not up to the school. Maybe; maybe not, but this doesn't change whether the act is or isn't a crime. Generally correct, although whether something "needs to be documented via police report" is a matter of subjective opinion. Ultimately, anyone with knowledge of the relevant facts, can report the matter to the police. The police can choose to investigate and take a report or not. If they choose the former, then they can choose to report the matter to the prosecutor for prosecution, or not. If the matter is referred to the prosecutor, then the prosecutor gets to choose whether or not to file charges.
  8. This is an 8-year old thread. The issue raised in the original post almost certainly has been resolved by now, and it's unlikely that the OP is going to post here again.
  9. Since you didn't tell us what state you're in, no one can tell you about applicable laws. What does your divorce decree/judgment say about this?
  10. First you say that "we" (plural) own a condo, and then you tell us what "I" (singular) want. Who are "we," and do the other owners of the condo want the same thing you want? Because...??? Because...??? Sure. First of all, if you are a joint owner of the condo, you can only leave your interest and cannot leave the whole thing. Second, if you jointly own the condo as joint tenants with the right of survivorship, you have to destroy the joint tenancy in order to be able to leave it anyone. You'll want to speak with a Florida real estate attorney about how to do that. Third, the condo association isn't going to care to whom you leave your interest unless the CC&Rs and condo association by-laws impose some sort of restrictions on who may own the condo. We obviously have no way of knowing what those documents say. This is why it's important to know why the condo association's lawyer said what he/she said. Of course, you can make your will and say that your interest in the condo goes to whomever you want, and after you die, this won't be your problem anymore. However, even if you do leave your interest in the condo to a charity, I would imagine that most charities won't have any interest in jointly owning a condo with X-number of living persons (or those persons' heirs). Well...that's obviously rather important and makes it such that anyone from whom you seek advice about this absolutely must read whatever document contains this right of first refusal. What if? You need to make sure your lawyer has and has read the relevant documents. If your lawyer tells you X despite the condo association's lawyer telling you Y, then you get to decide whom to believe. If your lawyer told you what you told us that he/she told you without having read the relevant documents, then it's meaningless.
  11. Again, what sort of school is this? Elementary? High school? Public or private? What state? New question: why can't you walk or bike home or take public transportation?
  12. All you've described is an employer firing an employee, except with an offer of employment from another employer. Of course that's legal. Sounds more like firing than laying off, but the difference between the two things isn't legally meaningful.
  13. Having a "disability" does not relieve you of the burden of supporting your children.
  14. I'll say it for the umpteenth time: there is no more significance to the fringe on a flag then there is to the shade of wood paneling or color of the carpet in a courtroom, and there are no magic tricks for flags in courtrooms or anything of the sort.
  15. Dwight Eisenhower didn't have nearly that much hair after his presidency was over. Nor was it that dark. Also, the person at the left of that picture appears to have three or four stars, not five.
  16. I sure hope it's written nothing like this sentence because this sentence is horribly ambiguous. Can you quote the exact language of the will (with actual names being omitted or changed)? Depends on the actual language of the will and the laws of your grandmother's unidentified state of residence. Trying to interpret your summary of the will's language would be pointless.
  17. This post has nothing to do with how to do legal research. The entire country? LOL! It's not the entire city that was cut off. It was access to Walker Canyon. Not correct. Sure. Hire a lawyer and file a lawsuit and seek a temporary restraining order.
  18. Maybe you should learn to write coherent English sentences before opining about legal matters.
  19. Answering only one of several questions isn't a good way to get helpful responses.
  20. Being told by whom? Why do your friends want to stay after school? What sort of school is this? Elementary? High school? Public or private? What state? Who are "they"? Huh? This is your friends' problem. Their parents should deal with this. That being said, there are 50 states in this county, and each has its own set of laws. I doubt that what you have described is illegal in any state, but I'll reserve judgment until you clarify the facts and identify the state where this is happening.
  21. Contact someone with Child Support Services, explain your situation, and ask what is needed.
  22. No one here has any way of predicting this. Not sure what you're asking here, but your description of the problem suggests that your neighbor and/or your neighbor's landlord negligently failed to deal properly with a known issue. If you haven't already done so, you need to contact your homeowner's (condo owner's) insurer ASAP.
  23. Your description is really hard to follow, but the map helps. I assume you're talking about someone making a left turn out of the Target parking lot onto Executive Drive. Correct? If so, please clarify the following statement: "person #2 enters the road from the side road from the left and proceeds in a speed greater than the other cars in parallel to them (the road is wide) passing the other cars trying to get to the left side of the fork." It sounds like you're saying that Car #2 was being driven on the wrong side of the Executive Drive and that the driver of Car #2 tried to slip into the right lane in between two cars that were already on the road. Regardless of any clarification you may provide, nothing anyone on the internet tells you about who might be "at fault" will be meaningful or useful. Assuming both drivers are properly insured, their insurance carriers will sort things out and, if that doesn't happen, then the matter will presumably proceed to court.
  24. Ummm...the original post rather clearly says that the OP "found out [his/her father's death] by accident by looking up obituaries."
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