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DumplinHoneychild

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DumplinHoneychild last won the day on October 13 2016

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About DumplinHoneychild

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  1. If you are waiting until the very last minute to exercise your contract rights, you are most certainly playing with fire, and I can't help but think you are playing games. Now the seller's agent is also trying to play those same games. It's probably time to get a local real estate lawyer involved.
  2. I once met a nice looking person online. The person needed me to provide a cellphone so we could speak directly. A sister in UAE (I think it was) would receive the phone and deliver it when she visited. Fortunately, at about the same time I also received a nice letter from an oil ministry worker in Nigeria who had money he needed to transfer. So I put them in contact with each other. I hoped it worked out for the best for them.
  3. To which inspections is your second inspector referring? From your description, it sounds as if the flipper did not have the proper city/municipal inspectors visit the project to inspect the various systems (electrical, plumbing, HVAC, etc.) as might be required by law or regulation. I can understand how those types of inspections might disclose the problems you described. Your typical home inspection for a sale might disclose the age or the systems or any obvious problems as well as running the system through an operating cycle to ensure the system is working.
  4. Draconian? Really? We do not know all the details, but it is entirely possible that this club/event organizer could also face serious consequences for allowing alcohol consumption or outside food and drink at its festival, particularly if the event occurred in a public space or the involved catering/concessions agreements with the location owner. Often if food and beverage (alcoholic or otherwise) is offered for sale in the event venue, the venue user may be required to agree to meet a certain level of sales or else pay higher fees. There are just too many different possibilities here that would expose the event organizer to liability to suggest the action was draconian. Besides, you already have someone who has willingly violated the rules. Why should the event organizer trust the individual not to sneak the beer back into the venue or drink it in the parking lot (if that is even an option here)?
  5. You'll need to find a website dealing with the laws of India. This site addresses laws in the United States.
  6. It appears that you and your management company may have different theories of property management. From the content and nature of your post, I imagine that you may be much more of a stickler when it comes to definitions of reasonable wear and tear, tenant damages and oversight of otherwise mundane processes (like the inspection once the tenant moves out). Not that there's anything wring with that. However, does your contract with the management company clearly express how all these issues will be handled, e.g., who will be present for inspections, what level of inspection is required, how quickly will security deposits be released, etc.? If not, I recommend that you find a new management company that better suits your needs and desired level of control or oversight. Or perform the work yourself. Otherwise, nothing in your post suggests you have any worthwhile cause of action against the management company (again, unless you believe the management company damaged the dishwasher or the minor repairs were not made).
  7. I have a theory. Was your brother in a nursing home when he passed? Did he has other financial resources? I am beginning to wonder if the nursing home might have been the primary beneficiary under the irrevocable trust. In other words, your brother may have used the house to guarantee his financial obligations to the nursing home for his continued care. Regardless, in addition to asking for copies of any existing wills or trust documents or going to the probate office looking for any filings from your brother, you may also want to do a title search for the family home. If the title transfer in 1985 from your father to your brother makes no mention of any contingencies, life estates, reversionary interests, etc., then your father's 1989 testamentary wishes on a yellow legal pad will be meaningless. Besides not constituting a valid will, your father could not have devised real property that he no longer owned (i.e., that he had already transferred title to). The subsequent quit claim deed to the trust may also have helpful information.
  8. A successful medical malpractice claim requires that the plaintiff demonstrate the medical professional failed to exercise a reasonable duty of care. If the wound did not present with obvious signs of a spider bite (particularly a brown recluse), it may be reasonable to treat for a far more common type of injury first. Good luck.
  9. You do not specify how custody is shared or what limitations may have been agreed to in any custody agreement, but I presume that with a 42 day visitation period, your ex-husband will have rather broad parental rights. That would include the right to entrust your son to the care of another adult your ex-husband felt was responsible. Your ex-husband could just as easily have sent your son to summer camp, left him with his sister all summer or found your son a summer job. Again, it all depends on your custody arrangement, and you provided no details.
  10. It's great that at least you are acting like and adult and trying to do the right thing. At the end of July this young man will legally be an adult and on his own, so it sounds like he will need a crash course in how to take care of himself. I would certainly be apprehensive about someone who is still somewhat of a stranger taking up residence in my home (and near my teenage daughter). I do not think contacting the authorities would be pointless. I think you should begin by contacting child protective services and finding out what assistance is available. I would also reach out to services that assist runaway and/or homeless youth. If nothing else, you will be armed with more information.
  11. Hmmm. San Diego to Europe. Are you active military? You may want to explore options under the Service Members Civil Relief Act.
  12. In addition to reporting to the lender, you'll also have an additional claim in the divorce proceedings. You may also want to check your credit reports and, if the car loan appears on your report, dispute it.
  13. This is not necessarily and indication that you were lied to by the leasing agent. I presume that the inspector reported that he did not uncover pests in any of the areas he was able to access. We have no way of knowing if he told the leasing agent he was unable to access certain areas of the home, and his inspection was therefore incomplete. The fact that you have a child has no bearing on habitability of the residence. That an ant colony lives in the outdoor storage shed is also unlikely to have any bearing on the habitability of the residence. I don't recall ever seeing a backyard shed that didn't have bugs in it. As suggested, buy a commercially available ant killer and/or termite killer apply it (I presume the termites do not continually swarm or are a regular occurrence). This will be a far simpler solution that terminating a lease early.
  14. I agree that without all the facts and lease documents, building rules, etc. to which the tenant may have agreed, it is difficult to assess the landlord's ability to collect the fine. However, a $1,000 fine in in the Manhattan luxury rental market may be not necessarily be excessive (although you did not mention the location of the building). Did the landlord by any chance site the tenant with multiple violations for your actions or for her party?
  15. Just a note, I would not necessarily consider a search before 6:00 a.m. a violation of either the CA or U.S. constitutions OR consider the "daytime" requirement a stringent Constitutional protection. The founding father's may have had reason to fear the sovereign's law enforcers crashing through residential doors in the wee hours of the morning; however, warrants may still be executed before daytime where the magistrate or judge finds good cause.
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