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LiemLaw

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Everything posted by LiemLaw

  1. GuessAgain is on the right track but that's not exactly how it works. USCIS and ICE do not have agents monitoring criminal courts in all 50 states so if you don't serve any jail time, but got straight probation, they may not be even aware that you were convicted because local law enforcement is not obligated to notify USCIS and ICE about you unless you're going to be incarcerated. I don't know what state you're in and what 3rd degree felony there means exactly but some of my clients in California have felony possession convictions in the past where they received only probation but Immigration was never notified. If you are incarcerated, the way it works is that USCIS and ICE will be notified by the jail or prison authorities that they have a conviced alien, and they will respond by putting an "immigration hold" on you. The jail/prison authorities are obligated to release you to ICE at the end of your jail/prison term and you will be transferred to Immigration detention, where you will be placed in removal proceedings, BUT where you can hire lawyers to defend you against the removal, if you choose to fight it. So, you will probably be safe for now if you only get probation, unless you apply for an immigration benefit where fingerprints are required, since they will find out about this conviction. However, to file an extension of an H-1B, for example, at the end of your initial 3-year term, there is no requirement for biometrics or fingerprinting. That's not to say that you will be 100% safe. But it is not automatic removal proceedings.
  2. "By the way, before I left my house, I checked the copy of the paper of my wifes’ former employer application, it was a form from the labor department but I did not see any document or paper noted like i140" That's because the case never got to the I-140 stage. Every employer starts by filing a Labor Certification Application (the old ETA-750 back then) for a prospective alien worker, and when that ETA-750 is certified many years later by US Dept. of Labor, the employer files the I-140 with USCIS to do the immigration part. "didn’t this employer application “dragged” my daughters along with their mother as dependents or is it that petitions by employers do not “drag” children as dependents along with their parents.Since this was done on behalf of my wife in 2000 I thought they could have benefited from that application; specially now that I do not find my daughters old cases papers." The word is "derivative." Your daughters were "derivatives" on that labor certification application. Wife was the principal beneficiary and spouses and children under 21 were derivative beneficiaries. If you cannot find your daughters' old cases, then yes, they could benefit from 245i grandfathering if they were your wife's children at the time the ETA-750 was filed for her, which means they could file for adjustment of status here. But that has to be carefully documented and laid out as proof for USCIS. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  3. Frankly, I'm surprised you did not use the opportunity to explain more of what exactly you were misled of by USCIS, instead of calling what I said to be “somewhat foolish,” because based only on what you’ve described, I do not understand what they did wrong that you would have a grievance against. You stated that “I was informed from the time the petition was in that I cannot leave the country and I had to wait until my priority date came available before I could sent in form I-485.” Yes, you had to wait until your priory date became current before you could Form I-485. That’s basic immigration law. Yes, if you were out of status by even one day on the date you filed the I-485, it would have been rejected, unless your mother’s petition (or another relative petition) was filed for you by April 30, 2001. If your mother’s petition was filed by that 2001 date, then they would not have denied your I-485 on the ground of you being out of status since that would have been excused by paying the $1,000 penalty fee. Alternatively, if at the time you filed the I-485, you were still considered an immediate relative of your mother, that is, were still less than 21 years old, then regardless of how out-of-status on your visa was, your I-485 would also have been accepted and they would not have denied your I-485 on the ground of you being out of status. You have not described whether either of those two conditions above apply to you. Thus, I am puzzled as to why you are upset at USCIS. “I was informed from the time the petition was in that I cannot leave the country…” The only grievance I could possibly see from the little you’ve described was if when the I-130 petition was filed by your mother, you were less than 180 days or less out of status in the U.S. and you knew you should leave so that you would not be more than 180 days out of status in order to prevent the 3-year (or 10-year bar) from being applied to you in the future. Assuming that was the case, but USCIS told you you must stay while the I-130 was pending, then that was wrong. However, that kind of “wrong” is not something that USCIS is going to fix. They’re going to say that was your fault if you did not take care of your lawful status while in the U.S., which led to immigration consequences later, and you should not have relied on them for possibly erroneous advice. Have you been to court here in the U.S.? Every court here has a sign that says something like “The Clerk and personnel are not allowed to give legal advice. Please consult an attorney.” USCIS offices usually, although not always, have some kind of sign like that, too. The difference with attorneys misinforming you is that you possibly can sue him or her for malpractice or you can file an ethical complaint with the bar. For USCIS low-level clerks or officers giving bad advice that they’re not supposed to in the first place, you really cannot do anything about it, unless you bring a federal lawsuit. But those cost tens of thousands up front and I don’t think you would want to take that route. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  4. LiemLaw

    asylum

    " What are grounded standards for establising that the applicant did not establish status in Germany. He could not vote,own property own a business or attain a status similar to LPR here in the U.S." Those factors you listed is a good start. The standard under U.S. asylum law is that you must not have "firmly resettled" in a third-country prior to applying for asylum here. It's a question of fact, to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Get a good lawyer to argue that on the asylum application. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  5. From what you've described, I don't see anything wrong that they told you. You cannot even think about filing adjustment or even travel back to your country for consulate processing unless your priority date became current for a visa number to be available, which could have taken years. And then, when the time came when the visa number became available, if you were out of status then you did not qualify to file for adjustment of status if you're not a child under 21 of your mother. You said that you're out of status so I don't know why you feel you qualify for adjustment of status. You don't. You'd have to go back to your country to get any paperwork and that will subject you to the 10-year bar. See the article on my blog here. Even if INS personnel had told you wrong information, they are not attorneys so you listen to them at your own risk. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  6. Your wife's case was a completely separate case and had nothing to do with what you filed for your daughters so, no, showing evidence that your wife was petitioned by her employer in 2000 (and not even you, and it was done an I-140 petition, not an I-130) doesn't prove that you filed for your daughter 4 years earlier. How could it? However, you still might have proof in the girls' consulate file that the I-130s for them were approved, and something which has the filing date. Again, I recommend you contact my office at www.GuruImmigration.com and seek a consultation and possible representation. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  7. "I had struggle a lot and spent a lot of money trying to legalize myself first, my wife and my daughters, so I have doubts about the lawyer(?) making the paperwork for me now, because I have gone to different lawyers and they have asked me about if my daughters have ever been petitioned before 2001; and this gentleman tells me is not necessary because the petition from 1996(that was abandoned), qualifies them to interview in the USA" Why would you have doubt about lawyers when it seems the lawyers told you the correct statement of law more or less? Your daughters came illegally to this country so they cannot get their papers here unless a petition was filed for them by April 30, 2001. The "gentleman" (lawyer?) who told you your petition for your daughters from 1996 "qualifies them to interview in the USA" is correct but that is because 1996 is before April 30, 2001, just as the lawyers told you. The 1996 I-130 must have been "approvable when filed." In other words, it must have been capable of being approved if you had continued with it until the end, and not a shoddy or frivolous petition at the time it was filed. You may have to get your daughters' records from the government to get a copy of this I-130 if you don't have a copy and proof that it was actually filed. Similar to what your wife had to do with her employment petition. Without that proof, just saying that you filed an I-130 for your daughters in 1996 will not be enough for filing adjustment here. They would have to travel back to their country to get their papers. That could work fine if they're still under 18. If they're over 18 though, then traveling back will subject them to the 10-year bar from returning unless they can prove extreme hardship. You're welcome to contact my office as I would be glad to represent you. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  8. LiemLaw

    Marriage

    "I do feel that it is both unfortunate & unjust that a genuine relationship would be considered fraudulent because we do not live in the same property and I can understand that immigration would hold reservations about approving immigrants who may be deemed valuable to the workings of the economy." Marcey, please don't take it personally. U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) does not know you nor your fiance and have to assume as part of their job that every marriage case has the potential to be fraudulent simply because it's been abused so much. We all have heard about arrests on marriage fraud cases due to news reports, media, etc. It's the fastest way for immigrants to obtain their papers and so it's no wonder that so many people try to arrange fraudulent marriages. As a personal aside, even my girlfriend was recently approached by a female friend of hers to copy her and marry some guy from Bulgaria for a nice sum of money! I guess this girl was plugged into some local network of Eastern European guys here in L.A. wanting their green cards desperately. So, it happens all the time. Can two people who do not live together be genuinely married? Yes, of course. Can two people who do not have joint bank accounts or didn't file joint taxes be genuinely married? Yes, they can. But just know that through USCIS's experience of decades of processing marriage cases that, conversely, truly fraudulent cases have some pretty common and typical indicators of fraud, such as not having a common residence. Any alien can file an application, but the alien has the burden to prove and bring forward evidence that will make the case for the benefit being sought, not USCIS. You can file your application but understand ahead of time that not having a common residence will always raise suspicion initially whether the couple is truly married. Maybe they're only friends. I dare say even regular people in non-immigration context would raise an eyebrow. At the least, you will invite deeper scrutiny into your marriage, which will result in RFEs (requests for further evidence) and possibly investigations, which will slow down your case horribly out to years. At worst, when the adjustment is denied, USCIS will place you into removal proceedings. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  9. I assume he was below 18 at the time of your marriage to your husband or else it will not be possible. Your husband will petition for him as his stepson along with your son filing for adjustment of status concurrently (except that he will not be able to if he came illegally to the U.S.) As far as what forms, the same considerable adjustment of status package of applications and documents is required, just as with your own adjustment case. As I always say: 30% of a case are the forms and 70% are the supporting documents in determining whether it will be approved. You're welcome to contact my office to do the case for you. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  10. No, it goes into your SSN account. You should probably call the SSA and keep them updated of your address. Benefits are sent or deposited anywhere in the world, of course, no matter where the beneficiary lives. Or, you can go to SSA's website and ask them. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog)
  11. No, my response to you was not rude but telling it like it is. You have no business coming on here and telling people from other countries "to be careful of what they wish for" if they want to become U.S. citizens. That was rude and absurd. I don't know what happened to your daughters' benefits but I and anyone else can give examples of native-born citizens, such as my native-born American girlfriend who's a vet, no less, getting entangled in bureaucratic nightmares regarding health or insurance benefits. But that has nothing to do with whether you are a naturalized or native-born citizen. We all deal with the same system here and all face the same problems. And don't talk to me about living in my state of California. Trust me, in the country where I came from, they would not be providing health care, school benefits, and all kinds of government aids to millions of undocumented aliens as they do here. They would shoot them as soon as they set foot across the border. We're very generous and compassionate in the USA. And yes, "Liemlaw" is my moniker on here, you have a problem with that? As you can tell looking at any other thread on this forum, my real name, Larry Liem Doan and blog site are given as my signature on all substantive immigration answers I give on here. By the way, next time, stop using italics! It gives people headaches. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog)
  12. This is not an immigration question. You should have the terms of the contract described more for a lawyer in person or by email, to see if the beneficiary is entitled to any money. Also, a private insurance contract has nothing to do with immigration status: one can be an illegal alien in the U.S. and can buy and sell properties.
  13. "i am not only going to get all documets recomended in that quotation but follow your advice and get a good lawyer in case this unique situation arise an argument with the immigration department. i'm bursting of happiness and feel 99% positive about the outcome of my half-siblings cases now." I'm glad you're going to follow my suggestion but honestly, I'm not sure why you would feel 99% positive about the outcome of your siblings' cases. I really think the interpretation you're trying to advance is quite a longshot, and will be rejected pretty handily by USCIS even with a lawyer advocating the case. Not to mention the $1,420 filing fees (4 I-130 petitions) and lawyer's fee. But, it's your money and your belief. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  14. LiemLaw

    Marriage

    "First I would like to emphasize that I AM NOT A LAWYER...My final advice - and lawyers on these boards probably wont like it - DONT pay anyone - not even a lawyer - to help you file your paperwork." That is extremely broad statement. I've helped hundreds of educated persons in regular immigration proceedings who had no idea what they were doing and had to hire a lawyer to fix things, and quite a few educated professionals in deportation proceedings. Of course, some "easy" cases with easy forms can be filled out by well-informed people. But, when problems pop up (as they almost always do), it takes judgment and experience to know what to do to fix it. That's when people should hire lawyers. It saves more money after all is said and done than the wasted time and frustration. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog)
  15. LiemLaw

    Marriage

    I know I have answered your same question of a couple living in Miami and in NYC a month or two ago either on this board or another board. Yes, living apart is a red flag on possible marriage fraud. I recall answering then that you should wait to live together. It will save tremendous problems and headaches, not to mention denial of your application which leads directly to deportation proceedings. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  16. I'm sure they have their visa requirements, too. Try visiting sites that deal with immigration to Canada, such as http://www.immigrationwish.us/category/immigration-to-canada/ Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog)
  17. "Dear sir, does this requirement that a stepparent live with their stepchild in order to petition for that stepchild is it only mandatory when the stepparent is a woman? according to your answer to this lady, her US citizen spouse can petition for her 13 year old son because their marriage took place before her child reached 18." babyboy, in my answer to sceballos, who asked the original question in this thread, I never assumed whether the US citizen spouse is a man or a woman. I don't know if sceballos (or his or her friend) is a man or a woman either. It would not have mattered. Your scenario is a very unique situation. I see from googling this that Allen Wernick of the City University of New York's immigration law program disagrees with me (which is presumably where you got the quote from). He did not cite any authority for his assertion that you quoted though. The reason I disagree with Mr. Wernick and when I answered you a couple weeks ago is because the definition of "child" in the Immigration & Nationality Act includes: "an unmarried person under twenty-one years of age who is...( a stepchild, whether or not born out of wedlock, provided the child had not reached the age of eighteen years at the time the marriage creating the status of stepchild occurred;" The way I interpret this definition of “stepchild” is that the child was already born “at the time the marriage occurred.” Why else would the definition include a test of whether the child had “reached” the age 18 at the time of the marriage? That implies a child already in existence. Yes, you could argue that a child not born yet at the time the marriage occurred would have age 0 or negative age (!), which is less than 18, and so would meet this definition of a stepchild when it is born later. But then the statutory language would not be whether the child “had not reached” the age of 18. When I read the definition above as a whole, to me it strongly implies a “child” who was already in existence at the time of the marriage. The examples USCIS has always given for filing an I-130 for a stepchild is the way I interpret it: let's say, your father already had your half-siblings with another woman prior to him marrying your mom. Then, he married your mom while those half-siblings were under 18. Your mom would then be their stepparent. Thus, the marriage was after the time they were born. Even if in this hypothetical situation your mom had not shown any active parental concern for your half-siblings or never lived with them, because your dad was going into the marriage with your mom and they were married, there is still a stepmother relationship (and court cases have said so). Whereas, in your real-life situation, your dad and mom were already married. Then, he went away and had your half-siblings with another woman, who presumably raised them. Yes, your mom was still your dad's wife until he died, but the marriage was before the time those kids were born. It would be odd to have a woman whose husband left her to be petitioning for kids entirely of another woman. I fee that it makes a difference. I could be wrong, but even the USCIS Field Adjudicator’s Manual does not discuss a situation like yours. I would have to be convinced by a court case or a case from the Board of Immigration Appeals that has interpreted this issue. I don't think there has been a case that examined this unique situation before. You can only try to file the petitions for them anyway and see if USCIS will approve it or not. They may, if there is a good lawyer arguing for that new interpretation. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  18. LiemLaw

    overstay

    In regard to the expired green card question, I answered a very similar question on Sept. 3 here: http://boards.answers.findlaw.com/n/pfx/forum.aspx?msg=75746.1&nav=messages&webtag=fl-answersmb ; Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  19. My bad typo above. Should have read: "He can be petitioned for by the citizen just like a biological son (as long as still under 21), but he is not an adopted son."
  20. No, there is no need to adopt. As long as the marriage was before the child reaches 18 and the parents are together, he is the stepson of the U.S. citizen. He can be petitioned for by the biological just like a biological son (as long as still under 21), but he is not an adopted son. Since he is overseas, the I-130 must be filed first and get approved before he could do the final processing in his country. I'd be happy to help you with the process. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  21. If you are still married to the U.S. citizen, why not have him or her file an I-130 petition for your son as their stepson? That would be a pretty fast process and he will immigrate quickly here. If you are not living with the citizen anymore or if they don't want to petition for your son, then you will have to petition for him, but the process will be slow if you only have a green card. Even if you file the I-130 petition for him today, there will not be a visa number available for six or seven more years. It would be definitely faster if you file for citizenship 5 years after receiving green card or 3 years after green card if still living with the same U.S. citizen spouse. When you become a citizen, the I-130 you filed before will automatically convert to one for your son as an immediate relative as a child and a visa number will become immediately available for him to immigrate. As long as he is still under 21 on the date that you become a citizen, he will still qualify as a child. I have recently blog about green-card holders petitioning for their relatives at my blog post here. Be sure to check out my blog with useful immigration info. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  22. LiemLaw

    Deported

    The immigration authorities were telling the truth when they said your husband would be banned for life. There is a permanent bar to being readmitted to the U.S. legally when someone is removed (deported) and came back illegally. He did this twice. If he stayed out of the U.S. for the required wait of 10 years and then applied from Mexico for permission to reapply, then I'd say there might be a tiny chance that he could be approved. But, since he never waited outside for the requisite 10 years, but in fact came back illegally and is here now, his chance to be legal is zero. The Social Security Administration will not revalidate his SSN without proof of legal immigration status. Maybe an amnesty program in the future could help him, although even such a program will probably not help someone with two felonies and two deportations. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  23. Sorry, my sentence above should have read: "So, you accumulated only 10 months or so of unlawful presence in 2008 after all your time in the U.S...."
  24. OK, glad you clarified you had legal status in most of your 23 years except for the final year after your E-visa expired. You started to accumulate unlawful presence at the time your visa expired in Jan. 2008. Then, you were placed in removal proceedings and received 120-day voluntary departure from the judge in Nov. 2008 and left in Mar. 2009. The voluntary departure period is considered a period of stay authorized by the Attorney General. So, you accumulated only 7 months or so of unlawful presence in 2008 after all your time in the U.S., which would seem at first blush to subject you to the 3-year bar (more than 180 days unlawful presence). However, because you departed after removal proceedings had begun and not before, that bar is not applicable to you. The 10-year bar does not apply since you had less than one year of unlawful presence. Thus, there is no bar against you and there will be no need to apply for a waiver. If you meet all the normal requirements for an immigrant or nonimmigrant visa, you can be approved to return the U.S. and so you are free to apply at any time now. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
  25. LiemLaw

    how do I?

    Gravity, unfortunately, 12 to 20 million people are in your position in the U.S.. There are not a lot of options except that, if you marry a girlfriend who is for real and a U.S. citizen, you could get your permanent residence in your home country and come back. You must leave the U.S. to do that AND you must leave the U.S. no more than 180 days after your 18th birthday. If you leave after this date, you will be barred from returning for at least 3 years. Otherwise, you cannot get your papers here and so cannot get a valid SSN. You would have to wait for amnesty next year or in 2011 or something. Be sure to check out my blog with useful immigration info. Larry L. Doan http://GuruImmigration.wordpress.com (blog) Note: The above response is provided for legal information only and should not be construed as legal advice, nor to create an attorney-client relationship, which can only be established through payment of consideration. We do not offer free advice except for the information provided herein on FindLaw Answers which has been screened. If follow-up advice on your specific situation is desired, please visit my website www.GuruImmigration.com for more details.
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