Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Hasquestions

Why would "arraignment" be re-done on eve of trial 3 yrs after charges

4 posts in this topic

My friend is scheduled for a jury murder trial in a few weeks. Trial is set to go on and as part of preliminary matters, the judge had all the charges (40+) read out loud last court date. My friend wonders why the court would do this? He was arraigned when he was first charged. Then he was re-indicted a few months after. My friend wants to know if this reading is typical for pretrial or what other possibilities may have caused this to be done. He asked his PD, but his PD was too busy to answer and my friend won't get to see him again for several weeks. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Hasquestions said:

My friend wonders why the court would do this? . . .  My friend wants to know if this reading is typical for pretrial or what other possibilities may have caused this to be done. 

 

He can ask his attorney (only someone local will have any insight into what is and isn't common in this particular court), but I'm not sure why it matters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, found out some more info which could matter. At the 2nd arraignment, the State added a "Notice of Intent to Seek Extended Term or Natural Life Sentence". There is no death penalty in IL. Could this be the reason why my friend would have been reindicted? Does the State have to give the defendant notice that it wants this type sentence before it can try him on it? And, if so, does my friend get to object to that sentence being tacked on too? If so, what can he object to and how long does he have to do it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI, to the best of my knowledge, no one from Illinois (and definitely no Illinois lawyers) follow these boards.  I doubt that your friend was "reindicted."  It's certainly possible that it's customary to read the charges again shortly before trial.  The rest of your questions are things for your friend to discuss with his attorney.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0