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persecutedsister

Wrongful termination, righteous man

5 posts in this topic

There was another employee at my husbands work ( a retail business) who was somewhat of a bully. He enjoyed gossiping about other people in the community, the businesses customers, the customer's wives etc., and he would do so at the front counter, sometimes in front of customers. His language was often crude, his topics of gossip often lude comments about women. My husband never joined in this type of conversation, just went about his business, which greatly annoyed the other employee. Last week this man was once again gossiping about one of the company's customers ex-wife and how she (expletive) guys all over the county. My husband had had enough and told this man "that is enough gossiping! How would you like it if people spoke about your wife in that way? Do you talk about me and my wife like that when I'm not here? "

This bully then called the person at corporate headquarters who is in charge of hiring/firing and said "it's either him or me"! The man came down to my husbands work location, and after trying to talk my husband into quitting, fired him! My husband had brought up this man's behavior twice prior to this incident, and both times the man who fired him had said the bully's behavior was not right, and not what they expected from their employees, they discussed it again that same day, but yet it was my husband who got fired because he "couldn't get along with fellow employees". There was no one else my husband had a hard time with.. My question is this..the company failed to support my husband in disciplining his co-worker for his obnoxious behavior, even though their employee handbook states a code of conduct opposite of this man's behavior. Does my husband have any recourse for this most unjust firing? He did nothing wrong! Other persons employed have received " 3 strikes", before dismissal. 

 

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So, if this were a woman having to endure this behavior by a coworker, and she had made the behavior, and her uncomfortableness known to the employer on several occasions, would she have any recourse?

 

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