Alexxagon

Child Abuse/Endangerment/Neglect Case

4 posts in this topic

I'm writing a story about a high school aged boy whose parents divorced when he was young. His mom started using cocaine and heroin and becoming hateful/abusive towards him. There are at least 5 times where his life was put into danger because his mom didn't have money for drugs. I wanted to write about her trial and wanted some insight on things that might be brought up considering my knowledge of trials and such doesn't really go much farther than cliche crime shows. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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Not really sure what you want.  It is doubtful anyone here wants to ghost-write your book.  If you have more spefic questions about trials, you might get responses.  As far as your present post goes, I can't tell if you are interested in a trial involving drug abuse, child custody,  or child abuse.  The settings and procedures would be vastly different from each other.

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2 hours ago, Alexxagon said:

I wanted to write about her trial

 

Her trial for what?  For possessing/using cocaine and heroin?  For domestic abuse/neglect?  Both of these things?  Something else (a custody hearing wouldn't generally be called a "trial," but maybe)?

 

 

2 hours ago, Alexxagon said:

and wanted some insight on things that might be brought up

 

Things that might be brought up by whom?  Are you talking about testimony/arguments that might be presented/made during the trial by one side or the other?

 

Depictions of court proceedings in TV and movies don't generally follow the law (My Cousin Vinny being a notable exception notwithstanding the unrealistic comedic elements).  That's because actual legal proceedings tend not to be very interesting.  In a real trial, the prosecution's goal is to prove each element of each crime charged beyond a reasonable doubt.  How they do that will depend on the specific crimes charged and the specific facts.  The defense will try and discredit the prosecutor's evidence and offer evidence of any applicable defenses.  Again, how that happens depends on the specific law and facts.

 

It might be useful for you to sit in on some trials.  Maybe contact the local court clerk and see if you can find a schedule of some cases that will be going to trial.

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