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Can a company block legal internet radio services?

8 posts in this topic

I recentlly purchased an expensive AV receiver (Sony str-da-2800ES) for use in a home media center.My intent was to provide internet radio, Pandora, slackers ect thoughtout the house. (14 speaker distubition system) which I have been using with a media ctr computer. after hours of installtion and troubleshooting, phone calls to Sony.. I learned from *** "that that they (***) do not support theose internet services in my area. (zip code). That is all they would abmit to, but refuse to put it in writing (email). All the Advertisments state that they indeed do so. internet services is a "Key Feature" of this model and the reason I selected it. It nowhere states "not supported in the US Virgin Islands", where a 100,000 freedom loving Americans live. The only Internet station they "***" allows here is NPR, nation public radio. (*** wont even allow "Voice Of America" over their equipment. Is this a violation of my Rights? Consumer Fruad? Flase Advetising? or all of the above if so a "Class Action Suite". What can I do about this I have dozens of hours in time for an AV tech to sort this out plus a $1,000.00 receiver which won't preform as advevtised.

Thanks, I hope to learn something here, anyone, input wil be valued.

Edited by FindLaw_AHK
This post has been edited to remove personal or identifying information. -Moderator

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Their warranty limits their liability to just defects in the product itself (material and workmanship). It specifically does NOT cover "limitations of technology."

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"limitations of technology" is not the issuse here. there is nothing blocking this technology other than **** Poloicies. I had a Denon that the *** replaced for other reasons that provided great internet radio, the technology is " the internet" which works jest fine here in the "dot Com" domain, just like it does on the US mainland "dot Com Domain.

Sounds like a *** response, No disprect intended,

Edited by FindLaw_AHK
This post has been edited to remove personal or identifying information. -Moderator

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What you're arguing is not revlent to the issue. It s like buying a "cable ready tv' that only gets one cable channel yet you bought the full cable package from the cable company.

I have a Pandora account that works except on the Internet ready sony receiver.

copied from the sony add: ( all I get is NPR )

Convenient Internet entertainment hub

A built-in Ethernet hub lets you connect the 'DA2800ES to your broadband network and provides three Ethernet ports for your other Internet-ready devices. But easy connections are just the beginning. Access a virtually limitless variety of free music via Internet radio stations from around the world, or choose from a growing variety of online music services like Pandora® Internet radio or Slacker®. This receiver even comes with Netflix® streaming onboard, so you can instantly enjoy your favorite movies and shows. (Registration or subscription may be required.)

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You've posted on the wrong board (this is the "(how to do) legal research" board. I think you know precisely what you "can" do about it (sue or just complain). But this doesn't mean you have a viable lawsuit.

If the company from which you bought it won't refund or exchange, then you're free to waste time suing Sony for the money. This has nothing to do with a violation of your rights (Sony didn't enter into a contract with you, and it's not as though there was a sticker on the thing saying "this will work anywhere", right?). It's not fraud, but you're free to try and figure out how to get a court to say that they should put a sticker on the device saying "This may not work for your purposes where you live; please see X-Y-Z before you buy."

It shouldn't take dozens of hours for an AV tech to come up with the answer on this, so that may have been a bad judgment call on your part.

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I posted for intelligent advice not unsound argument, you seem to be full of the second. by the way there is a sticker on it stating just such claims.

I hope there are other posters out there, maybe I did pick the wrong board. In the Past I've been able to find avdice on find law, other than opionated pundits.

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I learned from *** "that that they (***) do not support theose internet services in my area.

I'm not sure who "they" are. You apparently identified some persons and/or companies and the moderator edited your post. I don't need to know the identity of a person or company, but it would be awfully helpful to know what sort of persons or companies you're talking about here. It seems from the rest of your post that "they" may be a grammatically incorrect reference to the entity that manufactured the AV receiver you bought.

That is all they would abmit to, but refuse to put it in writing (email).

Not quite sure why you would expect someone to put something like this in writing.

All the Advertisments state that they indeed do so. internet services is a "Key Feature" of this model and the reason I selected it. It nowhere states "not supported in the US Virgin Islands", where a 100,000 [persons] live.

When one buys a product that depends on an incoming signal to work, it is incumbent on the purchaser to ensure that the incoming signal exists in the location where the product is to be used. It is not incumbent on the manufacturer or seller to ensure that the product is only sold to persons who will use the product in a location where the product is to be used. While I can't say with certainty, it seems likely that this is not an uncommon issue in a place like the USVI.

Is this a violation of my Rights? Consumer Fruad? Flase Advetising? or all of the above if so a "Class Action Suite". What can I do about this I have dozens of hours in time for an AV tech to sort this out plus a $1,000.00 receiver which won't preform as advevtised.

If I have correctly identified the issue, no, your right have not been violated and you have no legal recourse. Unfortunately, you bought a product that apparently doesn't work where you live. I suggest you contact the place where you bought it and inquire about its return policy.

you're free to try and figure out how to get a court to say that they should put a sticker on the device saying "This may not work for your purposes where you live; please see X-Y-Z before you buy."

by the way there is a sticker on it stating just such claims.

What exactly does the sticker say? Were you aware of what this sticker said before you bought the product?

I hope there are other posters out there, maybe I did pick the wrong board. In the Past I've been able to find avdice on find law, other than opionated pundits.

Just because the responses you received are less than sanguine regarding your chances of success does not mean they aren't completely accurate. In terms of "find[ing] advice on [Findlaw]," the express terms of these boards prohibit the provision of legal advice. All we may properly do is provide general information. And, indeed, I can assure you that none of the persons who respond here regularly is an attorney admitted to practice in the USVI. Any responses you receive are based on principles of (in this case) consumer law that are generally applicable in US jurisdictions.

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