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wilson327

Foster Parents!!

6 posts in this topic

Okay, so here is my qeustion, my girlfriend grandparents want to become my foster parents, but my Legal Guardian will not let them do that because they will not fork out any money to anyone, but yet i dont even live with my legal gurdian. " Does my legal guradian have to pay my foster parents?' My legal guardian is allowing them to take Temorary Custody of me which is " 6 months." My Legal Guardian on the other hand will not talk to my girlfriends grandparents. So

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As long as you are a minor, your legal guardian gets to say who can care for you and who you may live with.

Nobody owes anybody any money unless it's ordered by a court of competent jurisdiction. Absent a court order, any money that changes hands is strictly optional and voluntary.

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my girlfriend grandparents want to become my foster parents

That doesn't make much sense since you apparently are not a ward of the state.

i dont even live with my legal gurdian.

With whom do you live?

Does my legal guradian have to pay my foster parents?

In order to have "foster parents," you would have to be a ward of the state. Whether the state could require your legal guardian to pay -- either directly or indirectly -- child support to your foster parents (if you had foster parents) obviously depends on the laws of your unidentified state. It may also depend on whether the guardianship remains intact after placement with the foster parents or whether the guardianship is terminated.

The far more logical thing would be for your girlfriend's grandparents to apply to the court to become your guardians in place of your current guardian.

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That doesn't make much sense since you apparently are not a ward of the state.

What is a ward of the state?

With whom do you live?

I live with my 23 year old brother

In order to have "foster parents," you would have to be a ward of the state. Whether the state could require your legal guardian to pay -- either directly or indirectly -- child support to your foster parents (if you had foster parents) obviously depends on the laws of your unidentified state. It may also depend on whether the guardianship remains intact after placement with the foster parents or whether the guardianship is terminated.

The far more logical thing would be for your girlfriend's grandparents to apply to the court to become your guardians in place of your current guardian.

So The guardian ship will not be terminated it will stay in tact,

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What is a ward of the state?

In this context, it means a child who has been removed by state or local authorities (e.g., child protective services) from the home of his or her parent(s) or legal guardian(s) -- typically because of something like abuse or neglect. Such removal may be temporary or permanent. Depending on the circumstances, children who become wards of the state may be placed temporarily with a relative, in a group home, or with foster parents.

I live with my 23 year old brother. . . . So The guardian ship will not be terminated it will stay in tact,

I'm not sure what you're trying to tell us here. If you're saying that your girlfriend's grandparents are unwilling to seek to become your guardians, then so be it. Even if they were willing, I have a somewhat difficult time believing that most courts would order something like that, with the only apparent purpose being that you could live with your girlfriend. While you didn't say how old you are, I assume you're in your mid- to late teens. It's also not clear why your current situation is a problem for you or why any sort of change might be legally justified. I assume you live with your brother with the knowledge and consent of whomever your legal guardian is.

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A "guardian" is someone who is chosen or appointed to make legal decisions for another person who is unable to make those decisions on their own. To learn more about this subject matter, visit the Family Law Center: Guardianship and read Guardianship basics as a good resource. For further clarification about your specific situation, you may want to consult with a local Family Law Lawyer. Many lawyers do offer a free consultation.

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