mkg013

Establishing paternity of an adopted child

4 posts in this topic

My son is overseas right now but we have been contacted by a 16 year old "Mary", who has been told that he is her father. He never knew anything about her until now. The mother originally claimed another man was her father and he is now deceased.

"Mary" was legally adopted by her grandparents. We would like to do a DNA test to establish paternity but want to find out the legal implications. For example, can they come after him for 16 years of child support if "Mary" is his daughter? "Mary" was born and lives in Louisiana. We live in another state. Also, my son would have been a minor when "Mary" was born, not that that probably matters.

We really want to know if this is our grand daughter but want to be smart about all of it to protect everyone involved. Especially "Mary".

Thanks for your help.

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My son is overseas right now but we have been contacted by a 16 year old "Mary", who has been told that he is her father.

Who are "we"? Who told "Mary" that your son is her father?

"Mary" was legally adopted by her grandparents.

The mother's parents, I assume.

We would like to do a DNA test to establish paternity but want to find out the legal implications. For example, can they come after him for 16 years of child support if "Mary" is his daughter?

I'm not sure who "they" are. Whether or not a DNA test establishes that your son was "Mary's" biological father is legally irrelevant at this point. In the eyes of the law, "Mary's" maternal grandparents are her parents and, unless the adoption was done in the last year or so, it's too late to do anything about that now (unless your son wants to adopt "Mary" are her parents/grandparents consent to such adoption).

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DNA notwithstanding, your son's parental rights and obligations were irrevocably terminated when "Mary" was adopted. Any paternity testing performed now would only serve to satisfy your curiosity. Consult local counsel.

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