doucar

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doucar last won the day on July 2

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About doucar

  1. The terms and conditions you agreed to abide by when you signed up request that you pick a subject heading the most likely fits your post and post only once.
  2. Do you have a question, or are you just venting?
  3. You are misreading his post. She has a much power as you let her have. If you want to stop her, you have to act, as neither a will, nor a trust is self enforcing.
  4. Have you reported it to the police?
  5. since you won't answer PG's question, I will ask it again. What constitutional right are you asserting?
  6. Without know what exactly you were charged with, it appears to be a class 1 misdemeanor. And yes you can be sentenced to jail for both the child endangerment and failure to appear. I would suggest you contact an attorney who practices in the court your warrant was issued from to plan the best course of action now.
  7. The executor or administrator of his estate.
  8. Did she have a will?
  9. Doesn't matter, a verbal contract is just as binding.
  10. Please don't tag your question onto an over 6 year old post, as the original poster is most likely long gone and you will get a better response by starting your own thread. On the notice you got from Social Security it outlines your appeal rights. If you disagree, follow the instructions.
  11. 177 F. Supp 3d 56. It is a federal district court case from the district of columbia. Just understand it is not binding precedent in any court. You can look up the case on google.
  12. 1. first you need to determine as best you can, if the person has enough non-exempt assets to satisfy any judgment. 2. Then determine if probate has been opened, as you will have to sue the estate. 3. Hire an personal injury attorney with experience suing estates and turn it over to her/him, as it is not a do it yourself project.
  13. Your best bet is to contact a company that does repossessions in the state where the car is located and see what they require and charge. Depending upon the law of the state that the contract was entered into and the terms of the contract, you can charge the buyer for the cost of the repo. You will then have to follow the law of your state in selling the car.