doucar

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doucar last won the day on March 26

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About doucar

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  1. Pull out the check book and call around.
  2. If he was not injured on the job,they could sue for the amount of their damages, no matter what the policy limit is. But in this fact pattern, they cannot successfully sue the employer for any amount. policy limits only limits what the insurance company will pay, not what you can sue for.
  3. The court should have appointed him an attorney, if he is facing jail time. This is not the place to find an attorney.
  4. There is a find a lawyer on each page.
  5. First of all, this is not stolen money, it is a breach of contract and if you report it to the police, they will tell you it is a civil matter. Take him to small claims court and you can both tell your side of the story and the judge will decide.
  6. The hospital has social workers specifically for this type of situation.
  7. 1. His sole remedy is workers comp, any health insurance he has will deny coverage once it learns it is a job related injury and seek reimbursement from the workers comp carrier. 2. He has no insurance coverage. If he wants to pay for it himself, he is free to do it. 3. If the employer has coverage and makes it available to the employee, that is all that is required. 4. Any one can sue, but it will be dismissed, because workers comp is the exclusive remedy for injuries on the job, with a few exceptions not involved here. 5. Anyone can sue for anything, but what would she sue for that she could recover?
  8. So, you don't want to pay an attorney to review the documents including the context of the portion you are concerned about and the law of your state as it relates to the documents, but you are asking the strangers on the internet to do the same thing for free, and you haven't even told them what state you are in?
  9. Then, legally he is not your son. I understand that emotionally he is. As I said before you can report her behaviour to CPS if you feel it is endangering the child and see if they will give you custody after you move out or she moves out. But no guarantees.
  10. As you have probably figured out you are in a tough situation. Were you married to her when the child was born? If so, there is a legal presumption that you are the father. If not, you are a legal stranger to the child and if you reported her actions to CPS, you have a small chance for custody over a foster parent, but far from guaranteed.
  11. If you plead guilty, there is nothing at this point to dismiss or quash. Motion to dismiss is used when you want the court to drop the charges. A motion to quash is used to try and exclude evidence for the trial or throw out the charging document for some defect. How long ago was the guilty plea entered? BTW, what does this have to do with child custody or support?
  12. It is contract not state law. You best bet is to contact the customer service at the insurance company to find out what is going on. If it is a hospital and not a doctor's office as indicated in your original post, there may also have been a deductable that they did not determine at the time of the service. There is no time limit, on when they can send out a bill, it may be bad business practice to wait a year, but not illegal.
  13. Without more facts, the answer would be yes, if that is what their contract with the insurance company says.
  14. What state are you in, as that site deals with Candanian law and this site deals with US laws.
  15. Should have googled first then answered. felon can become licensed to practice law, though not in all states. As of 2015, only three states and one territory outright ban convicted felons from ever becoming lawyers: Kansas, Mississippi, Texas, and the Northern Mariana Islands. This information was taken from pages 16-17 of the National Conference of Bar Examiner's Comprehensive Guide to Bar Admission Requirements 2015. - See more at: http://blogs.findlaw.com/greedy_associates/2015/12/can-a-felon-become-a-lawyer.html#sthash.yShDLgUV.dpuf