harrylime

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About harrylime

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  1. Have you told sister that you will volunteer your own time to work the insurance issues?
  2. You're kidding with this question, right?
  3. As Tax_Counsel mentioned, you beat this question to death on at least one other forum. If you are determined to scare yourself... Yes, you are very likely to be arrested and prosecuted for fraud. Now, what exactly does that answer do for you? Are you going to begin carrying your toothbrush around just in case you get slapped in cuffs sometime?
  4. Just because your brother wishes to be appointed to administer the estate does not mean that he cannot retain an attorney to assist and advise him.
  5. Original post deleted. Never mind.
  6. It could be that "whom" was confusing what must be included in the will and who must be notified of the opening of probate, which, in NY, is pretty wide.
  7. Told by whom?
  8. File for unemployment. Now!
  9. Then petition the probate court to order the custodian to produce the will.
  10. So, with all that blah, blah, blah, you really have no proof that this attorney has commuted fraud. I'll put it succinctly. Get some money somewhere to retain an attorney or you reconcile yourself to being happy with whatever proceeds you receive from the insurance policies.
  11. It's in the next subsection:
  12. Yeah, I wasn't at all clear about context. I was thinking more in terms of the attorney not holding the original will. The attorney would have no obligation to seek out whoever might have possession and make sure that that person files. That 10 day statute, and similar ones in other states, gets badly overblown. Yeah, it's there. But it's a sword in case the custodian of a will, for some reason, is obstinate about not filing. It's not as if someone walking into the court 90 days after the testator's death to file the will is going to be clapped in cuffs and hauled away to wear the orange jumpsuit.
  13. Are you asking if that is required? If so, the answer is "No." In fact, most testators hold the original of their will. And I'm not certain what you mean by "financial paperwork", but most testators do not even hand over any of that to their attorney. Pay for what service? Unless the attorney was nominated as the executor, there is no obligation to see that the will is filed. And, as I said above, attorneys generally won't even have the original of the will. And, unless appointed by the court as executor, attorneys are certainly not obligated to see that the estate is "dispersed properly." So, you are accusing this attorney of fraud? Something that potentially would get the attorney disbarred and possibly prosecuted criminally. There is something that does not ring true here. What did the estate/probate attorneys that you consulted have to say?
  14. Can you clarify what you mean by "executor of my grandmothers estate?" Someone only becomes executor by being appointed by the court. I assume that your mother was not a joint owner or Transfer on Death beneficiary on this investment account, right? What is the total value of grandmother's assets? Are there debts that need to be paid? Did grandmother have a will? Since you mention your mother's "half," I assume that there is at least one other person inheriting? Is that correct?