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police and dmv insurance information access


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#1 phdnpainting

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 09:10 PM

Do the police and dmv have access to my insurance policy/information? When the police ask me for proof of insurace do they have a data bank they may find information via the insurance co. web site or something of this nature? also do the dmv have access to something similar? Thank You, any information will be helpful.

#2 adjusterjack

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 09:22 PM

The specifics depend on your state.

But generally, yes, the police and the DMV have access to your insurance information.

Warning: Legal issues are complicated. Explanations and comments here are simplified and might not fully explain the ramifications of your particular issue. I am not a lawyer. I do not give legal advice. I make comments based on my knowledge and experience. I guarantee nothing. If you act on my comments without the advice of an attorney, you do so at your own risk.


#3 phdnpainting

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 09:47 PM

I'm sorry I did not mention my state. California is the state I dwell in.Where may I find more information on this topic, like the law in relation to this? Thank You, Your comments have been very helpful.

#4 Tax_Counsel

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 10:37 PM

I'm sorry I did not mention my state. California is the state I dwell in.Where may I find more information on this topic, like the law in relation to this? Thank You, Your comments have been very helpful.


California Vehicle Code (VC) section 16058 requires insurance companies to periodically electronically transmit information to the DMV concerning the insurance policies it has in force for vehicles in the state.

#5 phdnpainting

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 11:01 PM

Bless You and thank you for the link.

#6 adjusterjack

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 08:04 AM

The insurance companies include data on lapses and cancellations as soon as they occur. It's all computer generated so it's done instantly.

The police and higway patrol have computers in their cars for instant access to the DMV records and pertinent records from other sources like wants, warrants, criminal records, etc.

Warning: Legal issues are complicated. Explanations and comments here are simplified and might not fully explain the ramifications of your particular issue. I am not a lawyer. I do not give legal advice. I make comments based on my knowledge and experience. I guarantee nothing. If you act on my comments without the advice of an attorney, you do so at your own risk.


#7 Tax_Counsel

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:23 AM

The insurance companies include data on lapses and cancellations as soon as they occur. It's all computer generated so it's done instantly.


I used the word “periodically” in my post for reason. Perhaps in some cases it's done "instantly" but in many cases there is some lag between when the lapse occurs and when it is actually reported to the state. That may be just a few days or may be a month or more. It varies by state and by insurance company. The laws of most states do not require that the reporting be done instantly. They do require the reporting be done within a set time schedule. In CA, that is within 30 days to report new policies written and 45 days to reports lapses and terminations of coverage. See the link I provided before.


The police and higway patrol have computers in their cars for instant access to the DMV records and pertinent records from other sources like wants, warrants, criminal records, etc.


While many police do have computers in their cars, not all of them do. That fact, and the fact that insurance coverage is not "instantly" reported to DMV (much less instantly updated by DMV once received) is why there is still a requirement for the driver to carry proof of insurance with him when driving the vehicle.




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