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#1 Justasking2013

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 12:32 PM

We are a small automotive trim shop. We reupholster seats install convertible tops etc.
This is January 2013, in December 2010 we had a customer prepay for a set of seats to be recovered and the labor to install a convertible top on a 1975 Chevy Caprice. For two years we have tried to get the customer to bring the car in and let us install the top and seats that we recovered and have been storing. Now he calls and says he has sold the car and wants us to refund the money for the labor to install the top. Do we have to refund the money or can we give him a "store credit "for future work?

#2 FindLaw_Amir

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 12:39 PM

What is the shop's policy regarding such refunds? Did the customer sign any agreement with the shop for services?
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#3 adjusterjack

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 03:42 PM

We are a small automotive trim shop. We reupholster seats install convertible tops etc.
This is January 2013, in December 2010 we had a customer prepay for a set of seats to be recovered and the labor to install a convertible top on a 1975 Chevy Caprice. For two years we have tried to get the customer to bring the car in and let us install the top and seats that we recovered and have been storing. Now he calls and says he has sold the car and wants us to refund the money for the labor to install the top. Do we have to refund the money or can we give him a "store credit "for future work?


What your "legal" position is depends on what was written on the receipt or invoice when you took the money.

If you didn't address contingencies, then what you do now depends on how much you care if an irate customer bad mouths your business (right or wrong).

If you want to maintain goodwill I suggest giving him back some of the money (the part that you didn't earn). Just make sure you have him sign a release.

Warning: Legal issues are complicated. Explanations and comments here are simplified and might not fully explain the ramifications of your particular issue. I am not a lawyer. I do not give legal advice. I make comments based on my knowledge and experience. I guarantee nothing. If you act on my comments without the advice of an attorney, you do so at your own risk.





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