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Friend has infectious pneumonia, has given 30 days notice to vacate


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#1 SickTenant

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:45 PM

I'm writing this for my friend who cannot post at this time:

Three issues here.

1. She gave 31 days written notice to landlord, from whom she is renting a guesthouse behind his, on 1/1/2013 to vacate.

2. On 1/3/2013, she was diagnosed with infectious pneumonia, ordered to stay home, bedrest, for 2-3 weeks. Landlord inquired on 1/4/13 about showing the place, and was told that she was infectious for at least 2 weeks, and needed bedrest. He insists on showing the place while she is still bedridden.
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Any way to block this?

#2 pg1067

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 04:19 PM

Depends on the laws of your friend's unidentified state.

#3 SickTenant

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 06:19 AM

New Mexico,
Thank you.

He just delievered general dates, no times, as if in open houses.

#4 pg1067

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:24 AM

If your friend is still intending to vacate the premises at the end of the month, then the landlord likely has the right to enter the premises to exhibit the apartment to prospective tenants. While I couldn't find the specific law for NM, a landlord generally has the right to enter leased premises for that purpose upon giving reasonable advance notice. If your friend has given notice of her condition, then that's all she can do. If the landlord wants to bring prospective tenants into a place with an infectious person who probably hasn't had the time to clean the place up, then that's the landlord's problem. The big issue will come if the landlord fails to tell any prospective tenants about your friend's condition. She might want to post a notice on the door or something like that.

#5 Guest_FindLaw_Amir_*

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:23 PM

Because of the importance placed on tenant privacy rights, there are only a few limited circumstances where a landlord can lawfully enter your rental property. The specifics vary from state to state, but in general your landlord can only enter your rental property: If there is an emergency, If the landlord needs to make repairs, and If the landlord wants to show the property to prospective renters/buyers. To learn more about this subject matter, you may wish to visit the Real Estate Law Center and read Landlord-Tenant Law as a good resource.




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