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Movies and viewing them


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#1 joerea

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:00 PM

So i knew this guy years ago who worked for the movies.

One day he said that if you paid for a ticket you could stay in the theater all day as long as it was the same cinema number.

Is this still true and is there a reference to this any ware online?

If this is true i'd want to bring legal documentation with me so they couldn't throw me out.

also if the police were called about this and i wasn't breaking the law what would i say to the police officer if one came.

if i got arrested how would i fight it in court?

anyway that's been on my mind and i wasn't really sure what this fell under please feel free to tell me if there is a better place to post this but i figured in court it would fall under copyrights.

Thanks Joe

#2 Tax_Counsel

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 02:42 AM

This is simply a matter of contract law. The theater sells you a ticket to the movie. The terms and conditions of that sale govern what movies you can see while there. In every theater I've attended, the ticket only allows you to see one movie — try to stay for another without buying a new ticket for that second movie and the theater will eject you from the premises. If you refuse to leave when asked, the theater may have the cops come to remove you and possibly arrest you for trespassing. Even if you disagree with the theater about what movies you think the ticket allows you to see, if you are asked to leave, you need to leave. The theater has the right to determine who is allowed on its premises. If you don't like that result, your remedy is to sue for breach of contract. But I'll tell you right now, it'd cost you more to try suing than the cost of the ticket, which all you'd get if you won.


So i knew this guy years ago who worked for the movies.

One day he said that if you paid for a ticket you could stay in the theater all day as long as it was the same cinema number.

Thanks Joe


That may have been the practice of the chain he worked for. But there isn't any law in any state I'm familiar with (and you didn't mention the state) that says a theater must allow you to stay all day, and there never was.

#3 pg1067

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 08:12 AM

So i knew this guy years ago who worked for the movies.


What do you mean when you say he worked "for the movies"? "The movies" isn't a thing for which someone could work. Was he an actor? Did he work for a studio? Did he work for a distributor? Did he work for a particular movie theater selling concessions?


One day he said that if you paid for a ticket you could stay in the theater all day as long as it was the same cinema number.

Is this still true and is there a reference to this any ware online?


Your question asking whether this is "still true" presumes that it was true when this person said it who knows how many "years ago," and we have no way of knowing whether it was true in the first place. In any event, I'm not aware of any major movie theater chain or local theater that allows or ever has allowed a customer to "stay in the theater all day" (apparently, "stay in the same theater" refers only to the particular screening room in which a particular film is being shown). Rather, buying a ticket entitles the customer to enter the theater building and to view the single exhibition of the single film identified on the ticket at the time stated on the ticket (the only exception to that would be drive-in theaters, which are largely extinct now, which commonly showed double features, sometimes would show the first feature a second time, and typically would allow customers to stay through both screenings of the first feature and the screening of the second feature).

You need to think about this logically. Let's say a particular screening room has 250 seats and that a particular film is going to be exhibited in that room at five times on a particular day. If the first screening sells out and every one of the 250 persons who bought a ticket were to "stay in the theater all day," how could the persons who bought tickets for the other four screenings get in and watch the movie? Obviously, they couldn't. But they have tickets too. That would be pretty stupid, wouldn't it?

Now, we all know that most movie screenings don't sell out. However, many films (particular big-budget films) do sell out or come close to selling out during their first few weeks. I can also tell you that, as a matter of fact, I can't remember the last time anyone at a movie theater checked my ticket after I entered the theater building, so it would probably be fairly easy to sneak into another screening room to watch another movie (or, I suppose, to sneak back into the same screening room to watch the same movie a second time), and I know I did exactly that on a few occasions when I was a teenager. But, just because security was lax or non-existent, that doesn't mean I had a legal right to do that.


If this is true i'd want to bring legal documentation with me so they couldn't throw me out.


What would make you think that possessing "legal documentation" (whatever that means) would prevent the theater staff from throwing you out?


also if the police were called about this and i wasn't breaking the law what would i say to the police officer if one came.


You're asking us to predict what you would say under a hypothetical set of circumstances? I would think you'd be far more qualified than anyone on a message board to make such a prediction.


if i got arrested how would i fight it in court?


I haven't a clue, but I'll assume this is a moot question in light of my comments above.


i figured in court it would fall under copyrights.


It doesn't have anything to do with copyright law. It would be a primarily a matter of real property law and, secondarily, the law governing contracts by which a property owner licenses another to come onto its property (but no need to repost).

#4 Guest_FindLaw_Amir_*

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 10:24 AM

What does your movie ticket disclaimer state regarding this matter?

#5 adjusterjack

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 05:00 PM

if you paid for a ticket you could stay in the theater all day as long as it was the same cinema number.

Is this still true and is there a reference to this any ware online?





Why don't you try it some day and come back and report what happens.

Warning: Legal issues are complicated. Explanations and comments here are simplified and might not fully explain the ramifications of your particular issue. I am not a lawyer. I do not give legal advice. I make comments based on my knowledge and experience. I guarantee nothing. If you act on my comments without the advice of an attorney, you do so at your own risk.





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