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#1 brittanylynn2184

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:58 AM

In a long term healthcare setting is it legal for a new policy to come into effect without a worker signing to agree to it? Such as, you must attend mandatory meetings for each department and monthly, if you miss one meeting it is considered a call off and marked against you even if it was you day off and you already had prior arrangements?

#2 Fallen

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:02 AM

The type of business the employer is in isn't relevant. The law won't require that a worker sign anything or even agree to a new policy (unless it's a union or civil service job where the contract/regs require that).

I'll echo PG's advisory "warning" with a twist: (Many) legal issues are complicated. Explanations and comments here might not fully identify or explain the ramifications of your particular problem. I do not give legal advice as such (and such is impermissible here at any rate). Comments are based on personal knowledge and experience and legal info gleaned over a quarter century, and every state has differing laws on and avenues to address most topics.  If you need legal advice, you need to consult (and pay) a professional so that you may have someone to hold accountable.  Acting on personal and informational advice from a stranger on the internet is a bad idea -- at least not without your own thorough due dilience/research and confirmation as it applies to your situation.  :)


#3 NewYorkEmploymentAttorney

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:08 AM

In New York State there is no requirement to sign off on a change in policy, however, if you are not being paid for an entire day being worked due to missing a single meeting that will be a legal problem for the company.
Posted ImageThis answer does not constitute legal advice and you should contact an attorney to confirm or research further any statements made in this answer. Any statements of fact or law I have made in this answer pertain solely to matters in New York State and should not be relied upon in any way in any other jurisdiction. Additionally, we also encourage you to reach out to us at our website: www.QueensEmploymentAttorney.com or via Twitter (https://twitter.com/#!/EmployAttorney) or Facebook (http://www.facebook....RicottaandMarks) if you have follow up questions as we do not monitor questions after providing an initial answer.

#4 Guest_FindLaw_Amir_*

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:13 AM

To learn more about your rights as an employee, you may want to visit the Employment Law Center as a good resource.

#5 brittanylynn2184

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:21 AM

I am in PA. Looking for the legal side of things because I think I am gonna need it!
My contract is every Saturday and Sunday 8 hour shifts. But I have always attended the meetings that I could (when I have a sitter for my child) I explained this in the meeting today I would be able to attend all meetings if I could bring my kid. They immediately said NO!!! My contract states that I have 3 occurances (Call offs) before I am knocked off my position and only then may I continue my employment IF THERE IS A PART TIME POSITION AVAILABLE. Already missed one day. So now miss a meeting get suspended, miss 2 possibly lose my job or go to part time and lose half my pay per hour. When I am only there SAT & SUN. And we have anywhere from 2-4 meetings a month. This is just looking like I ain't gonna have a job for much longer!

#6 brittanylynn2184

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:23 AM

Policies change all the time and we never get a copy of them, just told what they say

#7 Fallen

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:52 AM

I'm not clear on the purpose of the follow-ups (you didn't ask any questions), but your child care issues aren't your employer's problem, I'm afraid.

I also would carefully review this "contract" because I sincerely doubt that it prohibits the employer from changing the terms of your employment at any time, including letting you go (or you being able to leave) for no reason at all (at will employment).

I'll echo PG's advisory "warning" with a twist: (Many) legal issues are complicated. Explanations and comments here might not fully identify or explain the ramifications of your particular problem. I do not give legal advice as such (and such is impermissible here at any rate). Comments are based on personal knowledge and experience and legal info gleaned over a quarter century, and every state has differing laws on and avenues to address most topics.  If you need legal advice, you need to consult (and pay) a professional so that you may have someone to hold accountable.  Acting on personal and informational advice from a stranger on the internet is a bad idea -- at least not without your own thorough due dilience/research and confirmation as it applies to your situation.  :)





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