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#1 gmonk69

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:14 AM

I have been with my employer since 2006 as the ONLY permanent employee. Every year they hire either high school or college intern. I receive 2 wks vacation and just recently requested 5 sick days. I receive no other benefits from my employer, because i am covered under my husband's medical.

In September 2012, I gave both attorneys a written letter of request for a raise and received a lower amount than requested and I am satisfied. A couple years ago I was informed (verbally) that they would decrease my hourly rate because "I was making more than one of the partners". They then stopped including my lunch hours in my weekly pay so I now work from 9-4pm EST.

The issue is when I have to take time off to go to medical appointments or school functions for my son. They do not pay me for the full day. Is there a law that states that if an employee works half a day they are entitled to the entire work day pay?

When I worked for another employer in 2003 they used to pay their employer for a full day if they worked 4 hrs or more.

Thank you for any assistance you may give me.

Confused Employee

#2 Guest_FindLaw_Amir_*

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:25 AM

What state is this concerning?

#3 gmonk69

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:54 AM

Connecticut

#4 LegalwriterOne

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 10:49 AM

State law does not require the employer to pay you for any time you are not at work. You are free to discuss using part of your vacation or sick time to cover those hours if you want paid.

#5 Guest_FindLaw_Amir_*

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 11:04 AM

You may want to visit the Employment Law Center: Wages and Benefits and read Exempt Employees vs. Nonexempt Employees as a good resource to learn more about this subject matter. You may also visit the Connecticut Department of Labor, Division of Wage and Workplace Standards for clarification.

#6 gmonk69

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 12:31 PM

Thank you very much. Have a wonderful weekend.

#7 Fallen

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 12:47 PM

"In September 2012, I gave both attorneys a written letter of request for a raise and received a lower amount than requested and I am satisfied. A couple years ago I was informed (verbally) that they would decrease my hourly rate because "I was making more than one of the partners"."

I'm not sure how the second statement is necessary (or some other extraneous comments).

Not that you asked, but I don't know of CT law requiring an employer to pay for any meal break; you're free to ask the state labor dept.

"They do not pay me for the full day."

They aren't obligated to offer paid sick leave as far as I know under CT law; I'd feel free to ask them about using vacation time for the absence. In the absence of a law requiring paid sick leave (and one that applied to your clearly small employer), they're only required to pay you for time worked. (They aren't obligated to offer vacation leave either.)

"When I worked for another employer in 2003 they used to pay their employer for a full day if they worked 4 hrs or more."

That doesn't mean there's a law requiring it. :)

I'll echo PG's advisory "warning" with a twist: (Many) legal issues are complicated. Explanations and comments here might not fully identify or explain the ramifications of your particular problem. I do not give legal advice as such (and such is impermissible here at any rate). Comments are based on personal knowledge and experience and legal info gleaned over a quarter century, and every state has differing laws on and avenues to address most topics.  If you need legal advice, you need to consult (and pay) a professional so that you may have someone to hold accountable.  Acting on personal and informational advice from a stranger on the internet is a bad idea -- at least not without your own thorough due dilience/research and confirmation as it applies to your situation.  :)


#8 NewYorkEmploymentAttorney

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:00 PM

There is no such law in New York State.

www.QueensEmploymentAttorney.com
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