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Pregnancy of Minor Child by 21 Year Old


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#1 Patsahara

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 11:28 AM

My 17 year old daughter has advised us that she is pregnant by her 21 year old boyfriend. He is in his sophomore year of college at a small local college with only a part-time job at a convenience store. His parents want him to stay in school because he is a member of the football team, and can't afford to get a full-time job or a job with more hours. They feel that he may lose his chance of making it to the pros if he has to alter his school life. He has told me that he is willing to do the right thing by taking care of the child and my daughter. He said that they want to get married when my daughter graduates high school in May 2013. She has her first medical exam at an OB/GYN on tomorrow, and already their is disagreement on the part of his parents as to who will pay the bill. My insurance will not cover her for the maternity; nor will they cover the child once it is born. I can see already that there is going to be problems when it comes to the support of the child. I'm becoming increasingly concerned with engaging in verbal agreements with he and his parents. In the best interest of my daughter and her yet to be born child, would we be better served to seek the advice of counsel and possibly see what legal guidelines that we can have this young man follow? We live in the State of Alabama and any advice that anyone has will be greatly appreciated. Thanks...Patsahara!!!

#2 Guest_FindLaw_Amir_*

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 11:49 AM

Could you please elaborate a bit more on what guidelines you are referring to?

#3 Guest_FindLaw_Amir_*

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 11:50 AM

Also, a good resource to visit regarding this subject matter is the Family Law Center.

#4 Ted_from_Texas

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:14 PM

Because your daughter and her boyfriend are not married, neither the boyfriend nor his parents have any legal connection to your daughter or her baby. They are not obligated to defray any of her prenatal or perinatal expenses, or to provide support of any kind. You and she will have to deal with those as best you can, with or without the help of insurance.

After the child is born (assuming she carries to term) she can file an action to establish paternity and obtain a court order for custody and child support. The father's parents have no legal say in the matter, either before or after the child is born. If the father is unemployed or underemployed, his income may be imputed at full-time minimum wage for the purpose of child support. Depending on the relevant Alabama laws and judicial guidelines, it may also be possible to impute the room and board he receives from his parents as income. If he cannot make the court-ordered support payments, it will be up to his parents to decide whether to help him out or let him quit school and get a real job.

I strongly suggest you and your daughter consult with a local family law attorney ASAP to learn everyone's rights, obligations and possible options under the circumstances. Good luck!

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:59 PM

I agree with the previous poster, you and your daughter may want to consult with a local Alabama Family Law Lawyer to advise you further on this matter.

#6 pg1067

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 01:33 PM

I'm not sure I really understand your question.

Until the child is born, your daughter's medical care is entirely her and your responsibility. The alleged father's parents have no responsibility whatsoever to do anything. Once the child is born, your daughter can seek to have paternity established and request that the court enter a child support order.


Depending on the relevant Alabama laws and judicial guidelines, it may also be possible to impute the room and board he receives from his parents as income.


Along these same lines, if this man is a Division 1 football player on scholarship (which is suggested by your statement that he has aspirations of playing professional football), it may be possible to have the value of his scholarship and other benefits received from the university imputed as income. Moreover, given the widespread corruption connected with college football (especially in places like Alabama), it might behoove you and your daughter to bring it to the attention of the head coach and/or a booster or two that he has or may have fathered a child.

#7 Ted_from_Texas

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 02:18 PM

It's much easier for me to believe the boy and his parents are deluding themselves, than to believe a bona fide 21-year-old pro football prospect is spending his sophomore year at a small local college, with or without a scholarship. Especially in Alabama.

#8 Patsahara

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 03:08 PM

Could you please elaborate a bit more on what guidelines you are referring to?


I may have not used the correct terminology, but by guidelines, for example: The non-custodial parent may be required by the court to pay monthly child support (an amount specified by the state's child support guidelines), provide health insurance, and provide child day care expenses (if needed).

#9 Patsahara

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 03:44 PM

Because your daughter and her boyfriend are not married, neither the boyfriend nor his parents have any legal connection to your daughter or her baby. They are not obligated to defray any of her prenatal or perinatal expenses, or to provide support of any kind. You and she will have to deal with those as best you can, with or without the help of insurance.

After the child is born (assuming she carries to term) she can file an action to establish paternity and obtain a court order for custody and child support. The father's parents have no legal say in the matter, either before or after the child is born. If the father is unemployed or underemployed, his income may be imputed at full-time minimum wage for the purpose of child support. Depending on the relevant Alabama laws and judicial guidelines, it may also be possible to impute the room and board he receives from his parents as income. If he cannot make the court-ordered support payments, it will be up to his parents to decide whether to help him out or let him quit school and get a real job.

I strongly suggest you and your daughter consult with a local family law attorney ASAP to learn everyone's rights, obligations and possible options under the circumstances. Good luck!


Thanks for the great insight. It appears that he, my daughter, and his parents are putting their eggs in the basket that in 2 years he will be playing pro football. I did some research and over the past 10-15 years, there hasn't been a lot of football players drafted from *****...I think one player in 2011. I had never given much thought as to his income received for room and board. Nor had we thought about child support being calculated from the potential to earn at least minimum wage. Thank you very much for the feed back.

Edited by FindLaw_AHK, 29 November 2012 - 07:23 AM.
This post has been edited to remove personal or identifying information. -Moderator


#10 Patsahara

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 03:59 PM

I'm not sure I really understand your question.

Until the child is born, your daughter's medical care is entirely her and your responsibility. The alleged father's parents have no responsibility whatsoever to do anything. Once the child is born, your daughter can seek to have paternity established and request that the court enter a child support order.




Along these same lines, if this man is a Division 1 football player on scholarship (which is suggested by your statement that he has aspirations of playing professional football), it may be possible to have the value of his scholarship and other benefits received from the university imputed as income. Moreover, given the widespread corruption connected with college football (especially in places like Alabama), it might behoove you and your daughter to bring it to the attention of the head coach and/or a booster or two that he has or may have fathered a child.


Yes...I think the school is a Division 1-AA (about 5000 students). Not sure if he is on scholarship, but that is easily discoverable. Thanks for your post, it was very informative.




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