Jump to content


Photo

Neighborhood Eyesore


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 lookout1

lookout1

    New Member

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 07 September 2012 - 07:55 AM

I am trying to find out what the laws in Illinois are concerning the storage of a full-size refrigerator on the front porch of a single family home in a residential community in Chicago. The house next door to me at one time was scheduled for demolition and boarded up the City for non-payment of fines by the city to the owner of the property. (He basically abandoned the house for several years) as the kids in the neighborhood grew up they put 2 & 2 together knowing no one lived there and started to vandalize the place which is when all of us neighbors contacted the city and they went after the owner to clean the place up but he ignored them and all their warnings. He also failed to show up for court appearances regarding his property and it was completely left unattended for over 5 years. My husband use to cut the grass because unfortunately the house is right next to ours. Well, the house was set for demolition and low and behold about 2 weeks prior to it the owner shows up, gets a lawyer, goes to court and pays his fines and proceeds to let his low life nephew with no job live in the property, even though the windows are still boarded up. You wouldn't flipping believe it, he's living in a unbelieveable rotten old house that's just the eyesore of the neighborhood. Anyway, now the nephew has put a refrigerator (full-size) out on the front porch of the property just like it's a piece of the furniture and the doors are still on it. I thought there was some type of law about storing/disposing of refrigerators with the doors still on them. Not safe as small children could get locked in their. We have tons of small children on our block. This goof has no fence or anything from preventing small children from going up on his porch and climbing into this refrigerator to play. Could you please tell me if I'm barking up the wrong tree or not. If there is such a law, how can I take action. Is there a City of Chicago department I can contact regarding this? Appreciate your thoughts in this regard.

#2 FindLaw_Amir

FindLaw_Amir

    Platinum Contributor

  • Moderators
  • 62,345 posts

Posted 07 September 2012 - 08:18 AM

Is there a HOA for this residential community? You may want to consult with a local Chicago Real Estate Lawyer to determine if an ordnance exists in your area to address this issue. Many lawyers do offer a free consultation.
FindLaw's Legal Heads-Up! newsletter can provide you with the legal resources you need to make informed decisions when law touches aspects of your everyday life.

#3 menigmom

menigmom

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 15 posts

Posted 07 September 2012 - 09:27 AM

Sorry, I know there are laws concerning attractive nuisances but I question the idea that tons of small children are growing up with no behavioral restraints or training. Please, parents, TEACH CHILDREN PROPER BEHAVIOR. Children should not be iinvading other people's property, going onto other people's porches and so on. That is called trespassing.

#4 pg1067

pg1067

    Platinum Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 44,401 posts

Posted 07 September 2012 - 10:13 AM

There isn't a state law about this. You can google "Chicago municipal code" or "Chicago city ordinances" to see if there's anything there. Teach your kids not to trespass.

#5 Tax_Counsel

Tax_Counsel

    Platinum Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,873 posts

Posted 07 September 2012 - 11:14 PM

There isn't a state law about this. You can google "Chicago municipal code" or "Chicago city ordinances" to see if there's anything there. Teach your kids not to trespass.


Clearly you didn't look at the IL state statutes before you made that statement. A number of states, including IL, do have laws on this. IL state law makes it a misdemeanor criminal offense to leave an abandoned or discarded refrigerator with a door that that may be opened in a place where a child may access it. Specifically, 720 ILCS 505/1 states:

(720 ILCS 505/1) (from Ch. 23, par. 2356)
Sec. 1. Whoever abandons or discards in any place accessible to children any refrigerator, icebox or ice chest, of a capacity of one and one-half cubic feet or more, which has an attached lid or door which may be opened or fastened shut by means of an attached latch, or who, being the owner, lessee, or manager of such place, knowingly permits such abandoned or discarded refrigerator, icebox or ice chest to remain there in such condition, shall be guilty of a Class C misdemeanor.
(Source: P.A. 77-2347.)


Thus, one option here would be to contact the Chicago police and complain, making sure to cite the statute since the cops might not be familiar with it.

#6 FindLaw_Amir

FindLaw_Amir

    Platinum Contributor

  • Moderators
  • 62,345 posts

Posted 10 September 2012 - 06:40 AM

Excellent response and very informative.
FindLaw's Legal Heads-Up! newsletter can provide you with the legal resources you need to make informed decisions when law touches aspects of your everyday life.

#7 pg1067

pg1067

    Platinum Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 44,401 posts

Posted 10 September 2012 - 07:04 AM

Clearly you didn't look at the IL state statutes before you made that statement.


That's oddly poor logic from you, TC. Just because I didn't find the law doesn't mean I didn't look.

#8 Tax_Counsel

Tax_Counsel

    Platinum Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,873 posts

Posted 10 September 2012 - 02:52 PM

That's oddly poor logic from you, TC. Just because I didn't find the law doesn't mean I didn't look.


I made the (unstated) assumptions (1) that you are a reasonably competent legal researcher and (2) that you didn't falsely state there was no statute that applied when in fact you knew such a statute existed. If you were a reasonably competent researcher and looked, I think you'd have found it easily. Here's why. I went to the state legislature web site that had the state statutes, entered the word "refrigerator" into the search box, and got back a list of about 8-10 statutes with that term. It didn't take long looking at the summaries of each one to pinpoint the statute that applied. I'd say it took me no more than 2 minutes total time to find it. If you truly looked, I'd have to wonder what you did that you couldn't find it when a very simple search turned up this statute almost instantly. I dare say a first semester 1L law student could have done that.

And, of course, I'd hope you wouldn't tell someone no statute on the matter existed when, in fact, you knew that it did.

So, tell me, was I wrong in my assumptions? Should I presume from here on out that you are incompetent in legal research or that you misrepresent the law?

In any event, I do apologize for not stating my assumptions up front. You are correct that the logical argument is flawed when the assumptions upon which it is based are not stated.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users