Jump to content


Photo

Media Law


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 UMUCgrad2013

UMUCgrad2013

    New Member

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 23 March 2012 - 07:00 AM

 



  1. What is the subject of the case Children's Television v. FCC, 852 F.2d 1332,1338-40 (D.C.Cir.1988)?


  2. #2 lawtalkingguy

    lawtalkingguy

      Diamond Contributor

    • Members
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 1,192 posts

    Posted 23 March 2012 - 07:31 AM

    Roughly the case deals with broadcasting and "indecency".


    #3 pg1067

    pg1067

      Platinum Contributor

    • Members
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 45,183 posts

    Posted 23 March 2012 - 07:52 AM

    Google the case name and citation and read the opinion and find out for yourself.

    #4 UMUCgrad2013

    UMUCgrad2013

      New Member

    • Members
    • 2 posts

    Posted 23 March 2012 - 08:45 AM

    I did that already. This is my first law class and I wasn't sure if "subject" meant a specific item in the court document such as finding the case number or who the plaintif is. If subject just means what is the case about I can answer that just thought it meant a specific piece of the court document?

    #5 pg1067

    pg1067

      Platinum Contributor

    • Members
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 45,183 posts

    Posted 26 March 2012 - 08:01 AM

    If you were uncertain whether "subject" had a specialized meaning in this context, one would have expected you ask about that rather than simply asking us to do your homework for you.  Generally speaking, if you are uncertain how to do an assignment given by a teacher/professor (or if you think a teacher/professor might be using an ordinary English word in a specialized manner), you should ask the teacher/professor for clarification rather than asking a bunch of anonymous strangers who aren't taking your class and don't know your teacher/professor to do the assignment for you in the hope that they might know how to do it.  The person who told you what the "subject" of the case was probably assumed that you were using the word in its ordinary manner.






    0 user(s) are reading this topic

    0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users